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I'm working with a grammar which uses off-sided parsing (iow: Tabs as block delimiters). The grammar uses an indent stack to keep track of nested blocks, and attempts to wrap blocks with appropriate closing tokens when EOF is encountered.

std::stack<int> indent_stack;
int indent_size;

%x indent
%s normal
%s wrap

%%

<wrap>[ ]       {
                    if(indent_stack.top() > 0)
                    {
                        indent_stack.pop();
                        if(indent_stack.top() > 0) unput(' ');
                        return DEDENT;
                    }
                    else
                        yyterminate();
                }

<<EOF>>         { 
                    if(indent_stack.top() > 0)
                    {
                        BEGIN(wrap);
                        unput(' ');
                    }
                    else
                        yyterminate();
                }

<indent>[\t]    {indent_size++;}
<indent>[\n]    {indent_size = 0;}

<indent>.       {
                    unput(*yytext);
                    if(indent_size > indent_stack.top())
                    {
                        indent_stack.push(indent_size);
                        yytext[0] = '\0';
                        return INDENT;
                    }
                    else if(indent_size < indent_stack.top())
                    {
                        indent_stack.pop();
                        yytext[0] = '\0';
                        return DEDENT;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        BEGIN(normal);
                    }
                }
/* And so begin <normal> rules. */

At first glance, this grammar appears to work when lexing an input file: yyin = fopen(...).

However when I attempt to lex an input string: state = yy_scan_string(...), the first call to yylex crashes out with an error flex scanner push-back overflow.

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2  
I assume what you're asking is "how do I do what I want without it failing?", which I don't know the answer to. But if you're asking what the error means, it's in the Flex manual. "‘flex scanner push-back overflow’: you used unput() to push back so much text that the scanner's buffer could not hold both the pushed-back text and the current token in yytext. Ideally the scanner should dynamically resize the buffer in this case, but at present it does not." – Malcolm Rowe Aug 5 '13 at 21:44

(Answered in the comments)

@Malcolm Rowe wrote:

I assume what you're asking is "how do I do what I want without it failing?", which I don't know the answer to. But if you're asking what the error means, it's in the Flex manual. "‘flex scanner push-back overflow’: you used unput() to push back so much text that the scanner's buffer could not hold both the pushed-back text and the current token in yytext. Ideally the scanner should dynamically resize the buffer in this case, but at present it does not."

As you are running into system restrictions, I suspect this is as good an answer as can be made at this point.

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It is difficult to say without the code, but my intuition points to the <<EOF>> rule: when

(indent_stack.top() > 0)

You are unput-ing in a infinite cycle: EOF stays always true, and BEGIN(wrap) (wrap is a inclusive start condition with no <<EOF>>) appears to be doing nothing in that context.

Is is very easy to have infinite cycles in <<EOF>> rules when we have branches with no clauses of yyterminate, yyaccept, return or similar.

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Check if you have a recursive definition of any token in your Lex file.The error simply suggest that lex inbuilt buffer is not able to hold the tokens expressions. Are you getting the error while compiling your parser ?

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No it doesn't. See @MalcolmRowe's comment. – EJP Feb 21 '15 at 1:03
    
yes ,i gave you one of the possibility.The comment you are talking about is absolutely correct but is just a explanation not the solution.This is what i used to resolve my problem.I understand,there could be number of reason for not allocating the buffer automatically. – Ankur Gautam Feb 23 '15 at 12:59

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