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In short, I have multiple classes that I have created for representing data from different devices (cameras, actually). They both have different behavior under the hood, but the interaction is built to be the exact same from the outside. I am trying to write a utility function that can work with either class, or presumably any more classes I write, so long as the interaction is the same. I'm pretty new to C++, so bear with me if my terminology is not exactly right.

So lets say I have these definitions for each camera.

class CamDataA
{
int getImageStart() {return ptrToStart;)
    int getImageSize() {return imageSizeVariable;)
}; 

class CamDataB
{
int getImageStart() {return ptrToStart;)
    int getImageSize() {return width*height*channels;)
}; 

And I want to have another separate class that can work interchangeably with either class

class imageUtils
{
    //constructors/destructors

    int reportSize( void* camData)
    {
        cout << camData->getImageSize();
    }

}; 

But the error I get when compiling is:

error: ‘void*’ is not a pointer-to-object type

Is this even possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

void * is an untyped pointer. To call a method of an object via pointer, the pointer must be of the appropriate type. You can explicitly cast your void * to CamDataA* or CamDataB* if you know what object it points to, but that's not what you want (you don't know the type of an object beforehand).

In your case, it's nice to use virtual methods.

1) Define an interface. I.e. define a set of methods without implementation.

class CamDataBase {
  public:
    virtual int getImageStart() = 0;  // "=0" means abstract methods - MUST be 
    virtual int getImageSize() = 0;   // overriden in descendants
};

The keyword virtual means that the method can be overridden in descendant classes. This means that if we have a pointer, say CamDataBase* p, and the pointer points to some descendant class, e.g. p = new CamDataA(), and if we write p->getImageStart(), then there will be a call of method that corresponds real (current) type of object (CamDataA::getImageStart()), not CamDataBase::getImageStart(), although p is a pointer to CamDataBase.

2) Now define a couple of implementations of the interface. Methods that have the same signature as virtual methods in a parent class override them.

class CamDataA: public CamDataBase {
  int getImageStart() {return ptrToStart;)
  int getImageSize() {return imageSizeVariable;)
}; 
class CamDataB: public CamDataBase {
  int getImageStart() {return ptrToStart;)
  int getImageSize() {return width*height*channels;)
}; 

3) Now define a function that accepts a pointer to CamDataBase or any of its descendants:

void reportSize(CamDataBase* camData) // using the base class
{
   // type of the object and the appropriate method 
   // are determined at run-time because getImageSize() is virtual
   std::cout << camData->getImageSize();
}

And here are several examples:

CamDataA A;
CamDataB B;
reportSize(&A); // CamDataA::getImageSize() is called
reportSize(&B); // CamDataB::getImageSize() is called

CamDataBase *p = &A;
reportSize(p); // CamDataA::getImageSize() is called

// and even if we cast pointer to CamDataA* to a pointer to CamDataB*:
reportSize((CamDataB*)&A); // CamDataA::getImageSize() is called

I hope you'll search the Web for all the words that are new to you. :)

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you answer is correct, but I suggest you edit it and also explain to him what you did and why..I do not think he understand OO and that is the biggest problem he had here :) –  Dory Zidon May 22 '13 at 20:47
    
Agreed, I can follow the code, but still don't know specifically what you did and why. Thanks! –  zachd1_618 May 22 '13 at 20:49
    
Thanks, I will edit the answer. I just hoped that words 'virtual' and 'override' will guide him to begin studying OOP :) Not sure that here is the right place to go into details of such a well-described topic as polymorphism. –  Inspired May 22 '13 at 21:41

Seems the second function is lower case whereas you defied it as upper case, and you didn't cast it to a particular object. ((CamDataA*)camData)->getImageSize...

However that is not the way to do it in C++, I would suggest you read a little more about Object Oriented...as doing the cast and using void* is very C like syntax.

With Object Oriented you can have type checking (as you can pass anything to void*) and they provide more structure and clarity to your program. C++ (and other object oriented langauges) use Base class as a contract, that says all objects of this type should have these functions (method), so for example a base class of bag defines a method of PutItemInBag and then backpack, suitcase, handbag, etc all inherit from bag and each can have a different implementation of PutItemInBag and handle it differently, as this way outside object can handle all bags the same without having to worry which object it is, or if there is a new type of object in the system. This is done via virtual methods - Virtual Method Overview

Then you can make the base class abstract by having an abstract virtual method (making it = 0 in C++). This means this method has no implementation and you cannot create objects of this type. This class is only an interface (or contract) and methods that inherit from it should override this method and give their own implementation. Abstract Classes

What you need is to have both class have a abstract base class and handle it that way..

class BaseCamData
{
  virtual int getImageSize() = 0;
};

//then have both class inherit form it.
class CamDataA : public BaseCamData
{
  virtual int getImageSize () {return 50;/*imagesize*/}
}

class CamDataB : public BaseCamData
{
  virtual int getImageSize () {return 70;/*imagesize*/}
}




int reportSize(BaseCamData* camData)
{
     count << camData->getImageSize();
}

}

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