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I'm looking for a way to shorten this code up and avoid repeating code and if statements. What I'm doing is creating a calculator that searches strings for operators "* / + - " and executes them accordingly. Any ideas?

if(exp.charAt(i)=='*')
        {
            newResult=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i)) * Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()));
            primeResult = newResult;
            System.out.println(primeResult);
        } 
        else if(exp.charAt(i)=='/')
        {
            newResult=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i)) / Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()));
            primeResult = newResult;
            System.out.println(primeResult);
        } 
        else if(exp.charAt(i)=='+')
        {
            newResult=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i)) + Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()));
            primeResult = newResult;
            System.out.println(primeResult);
        } 
        else if(exp.charAt(i)=='-')
        {
            newResult=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i)) - Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()));
            primeResult = newResult;
            System.out.println(primeResult);
        } 

Also, is there a solution to accept a string with more than 2 operands? i.e. 5 + 10 * 2 / 3

share|improve this question
1  
Use switch() which may reduce your code –  Vikram May 23 '13 at 1:16
    
For multiple operands, decompose the compound statement, doing each operation in correct mathematical order (PEMDAS). Take the result and use it as the left or right operand to the next statement. Simple. Decompose and Evaluate step by step. –  Brendan May 23 '13 at 1:23
1  
As for the more than one operands you can program up the shunting yard algorithm. If you want I can add an explanation of it to my answer. –  FDinoff May 23 '13 at 1:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

For changing the code you could use a switch statement and putting some of the redundant code before or after the switch.

int left = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0,i));
int right = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1,exp.length()));
switch(exp.charAt(i)){
    case '*':
        primeResult = left * right;
        break;
    case '/':
        ...
        break;
    case '+':
        ...
        break;
    case '-':
        ...
        break;
    default:
        ... // Error Handling.
}
System.out.println(primeResult);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this is great!. How could it work with a for loop? say for(i=0; i < exp.length; i++) ? –  Clay Banks May 23 '13 at 1:37
    
You need to calculate where the operator is and what part of the string constitutes the right and left half of the expression. I don't think it would work for for(i=0; i < exp.length; i++) because not all i represent operators. You would need a different for loop header. –  FDinoff May 23 '13 at 1:41
    
You could do the for loop checking if( isOperator( exp.substring(i, 1) ) ) { doOperation( exp, i ); } –  Shadow Creeper May 23 '13 at 1:42
    
What kind of loop header? –  Clay Banks May 23 '13 at 1:49
    
@user2291971 I don't know something like for(i=firstOperatorLoc; i < exp. length; i = getNextOperatorLoc(exp, i)) where firstOperatorLoc is the location of the first operator and getNextOperatorLoc find the next location. However this doesn't do order of operations. Or you could just add the if statement @ShadowCreeper put up. –  FDinoff May 23 '13 at 1:56

There's no need of switch statements and complex hierrachies of classes.

In order to simplify and shorten your code and calculate simple and complex expressions (represented as String objects), you can use the Java's JavaScript API and it's ScriptEngine class, which basically simulates a JavaScript console.

import javax.script.ScriptEngineManager;
import javax.script.ScriptEngine;

public class MyClass{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // create a script engine manager
        ScriptEngineManager factory = new ScriptEngineManager();
        // create a JavaScript engine
        ScriptEngine engine = factory.getEngineByName("JavaScript");
        // evaluate JavaScript code from String
        System.out.println(engine.eval("(5+10)*2/3"));
    }
}

This will output: 10.0

share|improve this answer
    
I like your answer (using the ScriptEngine) better than mine, so I deleted it :) –  acdcjunior May 23 '13 at 1:28
    
Thanks, dude! Cheers! :) –  kocko May 23 '13 at 1:30
    
Ooohhh I like this one. It's a hack, but I like it and it's nice to know it exists. ;) –  Shadow Creeper May 23 '13 at 1:48
    
Thanks! I learned about it very recently. It can relieve us from the burden to write complex stuff. :) –  kocko May 23 '13 at 1:50
    
This should be on top... Owned my use of ScriptEngine –  Michael Ardan May 23 '13 at 1:50

You could write an AbstractCalculationOperation class with execute method, with Add, Subtract, etc extending it.

Then, just parse leftHand, rightHand, and calculationOperation and run calculationOperation.execute( rightHand, leftHand ).

    public interface CalculationOperation {
        double calculate ( double lh, double rh );
        long calculate ( long lh, long rh );
    }

    public class Add implements CalculationOperation {
        public static final CalculationOperation INSTANCE = new Add();
        public double calculate ( double rh, double lh ) { return lh + rh; }
        public long calculate ( long rh, long lh ) { return lh + rh; }
    }

And then:

    int lh = exp.substring(0, i);
    int rh = exp.substring(i+1);
    CalculationOperation op;
    switch( exp.charAt(i) ) {
        case '*': op = Multiply.INSTANCE; break;
        case '/': op = Divide.INSTANCE; break;
        case '+': op = Add.INSTANCE; break;
        case '-': op = Subtract.INSTANCE; break;
    }
    newResult = op.calculate( rh, lh );
    primeResult = newResult;
    System.out.println(primeResult);

Alternate enum variant:

   public enum Calculation {
      ADD('+') {
         public int calculate( int lhs, int rhs ) { return lhs + rhs; }
         public long calculate( long lhs, long rhs ) { return lhs + rhs; }
         public float calculate( float lhs, float rhs ) { return lhs + rhs; }
         public double calculate( double lhs, double rhs ) { return lhs + rhs; }
      },
      SUBTRACT('-') {
         public int calculate( int lhs, int rhs ) { return lhs - rhs; }
         public long calculate( long lhs, long rhs ) { return lhs - rhs; }
         public float calculate( float lhs, float rhs ) { return lhs - rhs; }
         public double calculate( double lhs, double rhs ) { return lhs - rhs; }
      },
      MULTIPLY('*') {
         public int calculate( int lhs, int rhs ) { return lhs * rhs; }
         public long calculate( long lhs, long rhs ) { return lhs * rhs; }
         public float calculate( float lhs, float rhs ) { return lhs * rhs; }
         public double calculate( double lhs, double rhs ) { return lhs * rhs; }
      },
      DIVIDE('/') {
         public int calculate( int lhs, int rhs ) { return lhs / rhs; }
         public long calculate( long lhs, long rhs ) { return lhs / rhs; }
         public float calculate( float lhs, float rhs ) { return lhs / rhs; }
         public double calculate( double lhs, double rhs ) { return lhs / rhs; }
      };

      private final char textValue;
      Calculation ( char textValue )
      {
         this.textValue = textValue;
      }

      public abstract int calculate ( int lht, int rhs );
      public abstract long calculate ( long lht, long rhs );
      public abstract float calculate ( float lht, float rhs );
      public abstract double calculate ( double lht, double rhs );

      public static Calculation fromTextValue( char textValue ) {
         for( Calculation op : values() )
            if( op.textValue == textValue )
               return op;
         throw new IllegalArgumentException( "Unknown operation: " + textValue );
      }
   }

and then:

    int lh = exp.substring(0, i);
    int rh = exp.substring(i+1);
    Calculation op = Calculation.fromTextValue( exp.substring(i,1) );
    newResult = op.calculate( lh, rh );
    primeResult = newResult;
    System.out.println(primeResult);
share|improve this answer
1  
To make it even cleaner, you can turn it into an enum Calculation with ADD, SUBTRACT, etc all implementing the calculate methods and a public static Calculation fromText(char textOp) method inside the enum that handles the switch. –  Shadow Creeper May 23 '13 at 1:29
    
The plus side to the enum variant is that to add say LOGARITHM or EXPONENT you just add an entry to the enum (implementing all 4 required methods - int,float,long,double). No need to worry about updating the switch statement everywhere it is used because it is only used in one place. –  Shadow Creeper May 23 '13 at 1:50

Shorten the code by grabbing the variables separately from doing the operation. This will not reduce your "if" statements, but it will drastically reduce the line numbers.

Don't do multiple variables until you understand trees... I've never worked with them personally, but I think "expression trees" are what you'll be after. (note: I just checked on google, yep, Expression Trees)

share|improve this answer

It's pretty simple how to avoid too much code repetition:

Integer op1= Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i);
Integer op2=Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1, exp.length()));
if(exp.charAt(i)=='*')  {
            newResult=op1 * op2;
} else 
....
primeResult = newResult;
System.out.println(primeResult);

But to do something more general, robust and useful, with arbitrary nesting levels, you should use some real parser. For example.

share|improve this answer

Here's a snippet:

public static void main(String[] args) {

        float primeResult;
        String exp = "4-2";
        int i = 1;
        ScriptEngineManager mgr = new ScriptEngineManager();
        ScriptEngine engine = mgr.getEngineByName("JavaScript");

        char[] myVar = new char[] { '*', '/', '-', '+' };

        for (int myVarCtr = 0; myVarCtr < myVar.length; myVarCtr++) {

            if (exp.charAt(i) == myVar[myVarCtr]) {

                try {
                    primeResult = Float.parseFloat(engine.eval(
                            (Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0, i)))
                                    + Character.toString(myVar[myVarCtr])
                                    + (Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i + 1,
                                            exp.length())))).toString());
                    System.out.println(primeResult);
                } catch (ScriptException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

            }

        }
    }
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