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Here's the behavior of a few format and princ calls:

(format nil "a")
"a"
CL-USER> 
(format t "a")
a
NIL
CL-USER> 
(princ "a" nil)
a
"a"
CL-USER> 
(princ "a" t)
a
"a"
CL-USER> 

I would have thought that the (princ "a" nil) call would have returned "a", but not printed "a" to stdout, but it still prints "a" to stdout. Also I'm not sure why there's not a difference between the first and second princ calls.

I tried browsing the hyperspec, but I can't find the information I need.

I assume my misunderstanding is because nil and t are not streams, but format translates them to the return stream (whatever that is) and stdout. If that's the case, how can I get a (format nil ...) effect with (princ ... ?)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
CL-USER 25 > (with-output-to-string (stream)
               (princ "a" stream))
"a"
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Urggh; I was hoping there would be a way without with-output-to-string, but I guess not. –  Clayton Stanley May 23 '13 at 5:37
    
princ-to-string is one easy way. The whole NIL thing is because princ uses a stream designator and format doesn't. –  Xach May 23 '13 at 10:13

The function FORMAT is different from other output functions in that it accepts NIL to mean "return the output in a string instead of writing it". The general solution as suggested by Rainer is to use WITH-OUTPUT-TO-STRING.

Usually, there are special versions of the print functions that return the output as a string instead. In this particular case, what you want is the function PRINC-TO-STRING which does the same thing as PRINC but returns a string.

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