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When I try to run this program, I get an error saying:

"fatal error: sales_item.h: No such files or directory.

#include <iostream>
#include "Sales_item.h"
int main()
{
Sales_item book;
std::cin >> book;
std::cout << book << std::endl;
return 0;
}

What's that supposed to mean? The book I read, c++ primer 5th edition, has taught me to define a class this way. Is it wrong? Why can't I run this program?

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It means it can't find the sales_item.h file. That's not a standard header or anything. You presumably have to make it and drop it in the same folder. –  chris May 23 '13 at 5:47
    
Show your Sales_item.h file (which should perhaps be named sales_item.hh); also show how you compile your example, and tell which compiler and system are you using. –  Basile Starynkevitch May 23 '13 at 5:48
    
That is not a class definition. –  Chief Two Pencils May 23 '13 at 5:48
    
You created sales_item.h header file? –  Naveen May 23 '13 at 5:48
    
How do I show it? Please elaborate. I'm very new to all this. –  judas May 23 '13 at 5:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes it is wrong.

let's say that this code is in a file named MyFile.cpp, then your piece of code assumes the declaration of the class is in the file "Sales_item.h" in the same folder as the MyFile.cpp source file.

The #include is in fact a copy/paste directive, that copy the content of the specified file in the current file, and the compiler compiles it. Now the Sales_item.h file doesn't exist, and the compiler gives you an error that it can't find it.

The correct way to declare and define the class:

#include <iostream>


// #include "Sales_item.h"
// What should be in the "Sales_item.h" file

#include <string>
class Sales_item
{

public:
    Sales_item(std::string itemName) //constructor
    {
        m_Name = itemName;
    };

    const char * GetName()
    {
       return m_Name.c_str();
    }

private: //member variables

    std::string m_Name;
};


// End "Sales_item.h"


int main()
{

    std::string bookName;
    std::cin >> bookName; //requires the user to type a string on the command prompt

    Sales_item book(bookName); //construct the object
    std::cout << book.GetName() << std::endl; // retrieve & print the item name on the command prompt
    return 0;
}

Another point is that in C++ generally your classes are declared in a header file (.h/.hpp), and defined in a (.cpp) file. In my example, the class is both declared and defined in the same file to simply. That is a different topic than what your question asks for, but read more on "declaration vs definition" in C++ if you want more information on how to code with good coding practices in C++.

The best approach, but more complex, would be to code my example like this: https://gist.github.com/jeanmikaell/5636990.

Over any book, I'd recommend you to read this concise tutorial before programming: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

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Do I just store this as .cpp in the directory of the code I want to run? –  judas May 23 '13 at 14:29
    
Yes, all in one .cpp and compile/run it. However, using the best coding practice, my example would coded like this: gist.github.com/jeanmikaell/5636990. Over any book, I'd recommend you to read this concise tutorial before programming: cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial –  JMik May 23 '13 at 15:39

It means the compiler can't find a file named Sales_item.h that you've asked it to include into the file you're compiling.

At a guess, the book wanted you to create a file with that name, and save it into the same subdirectory where you have the source file above stored.

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Hey, Jerry! How do I create the file? –  judas May 23 '13 at 5:52
    
@judas: You've apparently skipped over an important part of the book. Maybe go back and review where they taught how to do that sort of thing. –  Chief Two Pencils May 23 '13 at 5:53
    
@C. Lang, I don't think I have. Just re-read the last few pages. Nothing about this. –  judas May 23 '13 at 5:54
    
There are plenty of tutorial‌​s available. –  Chief Two Pencils May 23 '13 at 5:57
    
@judas: that's going to depend on what editor you're using, the host OS, and things like that -- stuff you almost need somebody looking over your shoulder to tell you how to do the first time (or else a book that insists you configure your system up a particular way, and gives very specific directions assuming you've followed its configuration). –  Jerry Coffin May 23 '13 at 6:03

See this link.

Few lines from this link:

How to Declare a Class

Classes may be declared in the files where they will ultimately be used. However, it is much better practice to define them in separate files. The classes can then be reused easily in any new application. However, there are actually 4 stages to creating and using a C++ class:

  1. create a header file containing the class declaration
  2. create a C++ file containing any functionality for the class
  3. call the header from the C++ application being developed
  4. compile the files containing the class functionality and the new application
share|improve this answer

This is the proper way to do this

Sales_item.h

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Sales_item {
 public:
     Sales_item(){};
     ~Sales_item(){};
          friend std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &in, Sales_item &si);
            friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &out, Sales_item &so);
private:
     std::string name;

};

std::istream& operator >> (std::istream &in, Sales_item &si)
{
     in >> si.name;
     return in;
}
std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream &out, Sales_item &so)
{
     out << so.name;
     return out;
}

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "Sales_item.h"
int main()
{
  Sales_item book;
  std::cin >> book;
  std::cout << book << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

source : https://sites.google.com/site/ypwangandy/tv

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