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In my code, the program does something depending on the text entered by the user. My code looks like:

switch (name) {
        case text1: {
            //blah
            break;
        }
        case text2: {
            //blah
            break;
        }
        case text3: {
            //blah
            break;
        }
        case text4: {
            //blah
            break;
        }

However, the code inside cases text1 and text4 is the same. I was therefore wondering if it would be possible for me to implement something like

case text1||text4: {
            //blah
            break;
        }

I know that the || operator won't work in the case statement but is there something similar I can use.

share|improve this question
79  
Why so many upvotes? Search for "java switch" in the internet and read one of the thousand explanations. –  Christian Strempfer May 23 '13 at 9:20
5  
Was wondering the same thing, such a trivial question... –  MMM May 23 '13 at 9:22
7  
Being a basic question makes it if anything more eligable for upvotes if its not a duplicate as its widely useful. And its something that didn't occure to me as possible but now that I realise it its blindingly obvious. So all in all a pretty awesome Q&A –  Richard Tingle May 23 '13 at 12:58
1  
@RichardTingle - are you familiar with Duff's Device - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duff%27s_device –  user93353 May 24 '13 at 4:25
6  
One lucky guy who got free reputation.. so jealous –  Java Enthusiast May 24 '13 at 5:14

9 Answers 9

up vote 102 down vote accepted

You can use have both CASE statements as follows.

  case text1: 
  case text4:{
            //blah
            break;
        }

SEE THIS EXAMPLE:The code example calculates the number of days in a particular month:

class SwitchDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int month = 2;
        int year = 2000;
        int numDays = 0;

        switch (month) {
            case 1:
            case 3:
            case 5:
            case 7:
            case 8:
            case 10:
            case 12:
                numDays = 31;
                break;
            case 4:
            case 6:
            case 9:
            case 11:
                numDays = 30;
                break;
            case 2:
                if (((year % 4 == 0) && 
                     !(year % 100 == 0))
                     || (year % 400 == 0))
                    numDays = 29;
                else
                    numDays = 28;
                break;
            default:
                System.out.println("Invalid month.");
                break;
        }
        System.out.println("Number of Days = "
                           + numDays);
    }
}

This is the output from the code:

Number of Days = 29

FALLTHROUGH:

Another point of interest is the break statement. Each break statement terminates the enclosing switch statement. Control flow continues with the first statement following the switch block. The break statements are necessary because without them, statements in switch blocks fall through: All statements after the matching case label are executed in sequence, regardless of the expression of subsequent case labels, until a break statement is encountered.

EXAMPLE CODE:

public class SwitchFallThrough {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        java.util.ArrayList<String> futureMonths =
            new java.util.ArrayList<String>();

        int month = 8;

        switch (month) {
            case 1:  futureMonths.add("January");
            case 2:  futureMonths.add("February");
            case 3:  futureMonths.add("March");
            case 4:  futureMonths.add("April");
            case 5:  futureMonths.add("May");
            case 6:  futureMonths.add("June");
            case 7:  futureMonths.add("July");
            case 8:  futureMonths.add("August");
            case 9:  futureMonths.add("September");
            case 10: futureMonths.add("October");
            case 11: futureMonths.add("November");
            case 12: futureMonths.add("December");
            default: break;
        }

        if (futureMonths.isEmpty()) {
            System.out.println("Invalid month number");
        } else {
            for (String monthName : futureMonths) {
               System.out.println(monthName);
            }
        }
    }
}

This is the output from the code:

August
September
October
November
December

Using Strings in switch Statements

In Java SE 7 and later, you can use a String object in the switch statement's expression. The following code example, , displays the number of the month based on the value of the String named month:

public class StringSwitchDemo {

    public static int getMonthNumber(String month) {

        int monthNumber = 0;

        if (month == null) {
            return monthNumber;
        }

        switch (month.toLowerCase()) {
            case "january":
                monthNumber = 1;
                break;
            case "february":
                monthNumber = 2;
                break;
            case "march":
                monthNumber = 3;
                break;
            case "april":
                monthNumber = 4;
                break;
            case "may":
                monthNumber = 5;
                break;
            case "june":
                monthNumber = 6;
                break;
            case "july":
                monthNumber = 7;
                break;
            case "august":
                monthNumber = 8;
                break;
            case "september":
                monthNumber = 9;
                break;
            case "october":
                monthNumber = 10;
                break;
            case "november":
                monthNumber = 11;
                break;
            case "december":
                monthNumber = 12;
                break;
            default: 
                monthNumber = 0;
                break;
        }

        return monthNumber;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String month = "August";

        int returnedMonthNumber =
            StringSwitchDemo.getMonthNumber(month);

        if (returnedMonthNumber == 0) {
            System.out.println("Invalid month");
        } else {
            System.out.println(returnedMonthNumber);
        }
    }
}

The output from this code is 8.

FROM Java Docs

share|improve this answer
    
oh ok. That was easy. Didn't know I could do that –  Ankush May 23 '13 at 6:14
8  
It's worth to mention that this language feature is called fallthrough. Cases without break are basically appended with next case block which is visually below, hence fall through. –  Emperor Orionii May 23 '13 at 7:40
    
@EmperorOrionii i updated my answer as you are suggested.Thanks –  PSR May 23 '13 at 8:12
5  
@Kobor42 first learn how to talk in public sites.Any how your suggestion is help ful.Thanks –  PSR May 23 '13 at 16:22
1  
@Kobor42 How about: Why have you used that formatting? Putting cases horisontally makes the code less readable and is generally considered bad practice [Reference optional but desired]. I have always felt that switch statements are a particularly readable format but presented this way they lose all that. –  Richard Tingle May 25 '13 at 20:11

you can do like:

case text1:
case text4: {
            //blah
            break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
for OP: read this also Java switch cases: with or without braces? –  Grijesh Chauhan May 23 '13 at 6:25

The case values are just codeless "goto" points that can share the same entry point:

case text1:
case text4: 
    //blah
    break;

Note that the braces are redundant.

share|improve this answer
4  
It's always a good thing when your entry points are sane. –  TRiG May 23 '13 at 10:19
    
@trig lol. I'm doing that kind of thing a lot lately - blaming iPhone thumb typing. Cheers –  Bohemian May 23 '13 at 12:17

Just do

case text1: case text4: 
     do stuff;
     break;
share|improve this answer

The fallthrough answers by others are good ones.

However another approach would be extract methods out of the contents of your case statements and then just call the appropriate method from each case.

In the example below, both case 'text1' and case 'text4' behave the same:

switch (name) {
        case text1: {
            method1();
            break;
        }
        case text2: {
            method2();
            break;
        }
        case text3: {
            method3();
            break;
        }
        case text4: {
            method1();
            break;
        }

I personally find this style of writing case statements more maintainable and slightly more readable, especially when the methods you call have good descriptive names.

share|improve this answer
1  
It is not more maintainable if text1 and text4 will ALMOST CERTAINLY do the same thing, regardless of a future change. If they should always be linked, making a change in the case for text1 (meaning changing which method it calls) would require a change in text4. In this case it is obviously not more maintainable. It depends on the situation. –  Nick Freeman May 23 '13 at 21:49
1  
I will say that this method should probably be combined with the other way anyway, since switch statements are not (IMHO) the prettiest programming structure. –  Nick Freeman May 23 '13 at 22:02

The brackets are unnecessary. Just do

case text1:
case text4:
  doSomethingHere();
  break;
case text2:
  doSomethingElse()
  break;

If anyone is curious, this is called a case fallthrough. The ability to do this is the reason why break; is necessary to end case statements. For more information, see the wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch_statement.

share|improve this answer

Fall through approach is the best one i feel.

case text1:
case text4: {
        //Yada yada
        break;
} 
share|improve this answer

Simplest trick it to use same method from both cases.

 switch (name) 
{
case text1: 
{
method1();
break;
}
case text2: 
{
method2();
break;
}
case text3:
{
method3();
break;
}
case text4: 
{
method1();
break;
}
}

private void method1()
{
//do the logic which is same
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this doesn't answers because Ankush(OP) knows this, he was looking for combine both cases... –  Grijesh Chauhan May 24 '13 at 7:33
    
Both are almost same, In both cases switch case executes for two times –  Rahul Saksule May 24 '13 at 8:38

The case values are just codeless "goto" points that can share the same entry point:

case text1:
case text4: {
//Do something
break;
}

Note that the braces are redundant.

share|improve this answer

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