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I got this code from one of my friends but because i did not work with perl, I don't know how it works. can you help me to understand it.

This file must get a file with some data that they shows delays and get the cumulative distribution function within the intervals.

#!/usr/bin/perl


#print "Starting converter on file $ARGV[0]\n";

if ($#ARGV < 2 || $#ARGV > 3) {
    print "Usage: ac_hist_gen.pl <input file> <num intervals> <output file> [ <interval size> ]\n";
    exit(-1);
}

open(infile,"$ARGV[0]") || die "Couldn't open $ARGV[0] for reading.\n";
open(outfile,">$ARGV[2]") || die "Couldn't open $ARGV[2] for writing.\n";

for ($i=0; $i< 100 / $ARGV[1]; $i++) {
    $dist[$i] = 0;
    $acum[$i] = 0;
}

$max=0;



if ($#ARGV == 2) {

while (<infile>) {

    if ($_ > $max) {
    $max=$_;
    }    
}

$intsize = $max / $ARGV[1];
} else {
    $intsize= $ARGV[3];
}

close(infile);



#print "size is $numpkts, max is $max, div is $intsize , test is $test\n";


open(infile,"$ARGV[0]") || die "Couldn't open $ARGV[0] for reading.\n";

while (<infile>) {

    $val = int($_ / $intsize);

    if (($_ / $intsize) == $val) {
    $dist[$val-1]++;
    } else {
    $dist[$val]++;
    }

#  print "val is $val\n";


}

for ($i=0; $i< $ARGV[1]; $i++) {
    $limit = ($i+1) * $intsize;
    $acum[$i]+= $dist[$i];
    $acum[$i+1] = $acum[$i];   
    print outfile "$limit $acum[$i]\n";
}


close(outfile);
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1  
Please tell us what programming languages you do understand. We can use concepts from the languages you do understand to help with explaining this program. –  Vorsprung May 23 '13 at 8:52
    
c++ but I cannot understand something like $val –  ali balador May 23 '13 at 9:02
    
$val is a scalar value ( meaning it holds one item ). It can hold one number (int or float), a string, or a reference to some other variable or code reference. –  Brad Gilbert May 23 '13 at 15:41

2 Answers 2

Ok, first a quick discussion of ARGV. This is just like char **argv that is used in the main() declaration of C programs

ARGV in perl is declared implicitly as an array. In perl we refer to whole arrays like this

@ARGV

and to the size of the array like this

$#ARGV

and to individual elements in the array like this

$ARGV[0]

arrays are indexed from zero, so $ARGV[0] is the first element of the array @ARGV

That's how the command line args for the program are read and that's what all the references to ARGV are concerned with

next item

open(infile,"$ARGV[0]") || die "Couldn't open $ARGV[0] for reading.\n";
open(outfile,">$ARGV[2]") || die "Couldn't open $ARGV[2] for writing.\n";

This is self documenting, given what I've just discussed with ARGV. This makes a pair of filehandles for input and output. Variables mentioned in double quotes " are interpolated to their values. So if $ARGV[0] is "filename1.txt" then "ARGV[0]" compiles as "filename1.txt"

In perl, as well as arrays, simple single value variables (called scalars) are also allowed

$x=1 is similar to x=1 in C.

In perl however, strings can be assigned without allocation of memory. This is automatic. String "type" variables can trivially be converted to numbers. A simple variable can start off as a number then be converted to a string and then back to a number all automatically depending on the context. Also it is not compulsary to declare variables! In C you'd have to say int x to declare it, this is not strictly enforced in perl

Next bit of code

for ($i=0; $i< 100 / $ARGV[1]; $i++) {
    $dist[$i] = 0;
    $acum[$i] = 0;
}

This is exactly as it would be in C except that the variables have some extra $ signs in front and there is no need to declare the size of the arrays @dist and @acum, or their type

Next bit to consider

while (<infile>) {

    if ($_ > $max) {
    $max=$_;
    }    
}

infile is a file handle and the construct <infile> reads one line from the file. But you will note that it isn't clear to where in the perl program the data is read. The perl trick used here is that there is a default variable that contains the last read line. The variable is $_. So all this loop is doing is looking for the max value in the file.

I'll skip a bit now and go right to the end

for ($i=0; $i< $ARGV[1]; $i++) {
    $limit = ($i+1) * $intsize;
    $acum[$i]+= $dist[$i];
    $acum[$i+1] = $acum[$i];   
    print outfile "$limit $acum[$i]\n";
}

This is a loop doing operations on the array @acum similar to the for loop above The print line writes to the output handle. The variables are interpolated as mentioned above.

Hope this helps your understanding

share|improve this answer
    
Declaring variables is strictly enforced if you add use strict; to the beginning of the file. It is also highly recommended that you do add use strict; (and use warnings;) to the beginning of any Perl file. –  Brad Gilbert May 23 '13 at 15:51
    
$#ARGV is not the size but the last index. scalar @ARGV or scalar context comparisons will get the size. –  Ashley May 23 '13 at 22:16

The code you have got is not written very well. Here you are a revised version:

#!/usr/bin/perl

# pragmas
use strict;
use warnings;

# read command line arguments
if ($#ARGV < 2 || $#ARGV > 3) {
    print "Usage: perl $0 <input file> <num intervals> <output file> [<interval size>]\n";
    exit 1;
}
my ($input_file, $num_intervals, $output_file, $interval_size) = @ARGV;

# find interval_size if not specified
unless (defined $interval_size) {
    my $max = 0;
    process($input_file, sub { $max = $_[0] if $_[0] > $max });
    $interval_size = $max / $num_intervals;
}

# fill dist array
my @dist;
process($input_file, sub {
    my $q = $_[0] / $interval_size;
    my $val = int $q;
    $dist[$val == $q ? $val - 1 : $val]++;
});

open my $fh_out, '>', $output_file
    or die "cannot open (write) file '$output_file': $!\n";

# fill acum and generate output
my @acum;
for (0 .. $num_intervals - 1) {
    my $limit = ($_ + 1) * $interval_size;
    $acum[$_] += $dist[$_];
    $acum[$_+1] = $acum[$_];
    print $fh_out "$limit $acum[$_]\n";
}

close $fh_out;

#
# process 'filename', sub {
#     my ($line) = @_;
#     # do something with $line, it is chomped
# };
#
sub process {
    my ($file, $code) = @_;

    open my $fh, '<', $file
        or die "cannot open (read) file '$file': $!\n";

    local $_;
    while (<$fh>) {
        chomp;
        $code->($_);
    }

    close $fh;
}

regards, Matthias

PS: I did not test the code but perl -c is OK with it.

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