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I have two branches. Commit a is the head of one, while the other has b, c, d, e and f on top of a. I want to move c, d, e and f to first branch without commit b. Using cherry pick it is easy: checkout first branch cherry-pick one by one c to f and rebase second branch onto first. But is there any way to cherry-pick all c-f in one command?

Here is a visual description of the scenario (thanks JJD):

enter image description here

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Eric Darchis's answer is now much more relevant. You should update your "chosen" answer. –  Jordan Feldstein Feb 7 '12 at 23:39
    
@JJD I've just saw your edit, but I was late to approve it, I don't understand why was it rejected. I'll apply it now. –  tig Sep 27 '12 at 22:27
    
@JJD I've grabbed it from suggested edit page ) Thank you! –  tig Sep 27 '12 at 22:36
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6 Answers

up vote 154 down vote accepted

Git 1.7.2 introduced the ability to cherrypick a range of commits. From the release notes:

git cherry-pick" learned to pick a range of commits (e.g. "cherry-pick A..B" and "cherry-pick --stdin"), so did "git revert"; these do not support the nicer sequencing control "rebase [-i]" has, though.

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In the "cherry-pick A..B" form, A should be older than B. If they're the wrong order the command will silently fail. –  damian Jan 11 '11 at 16:16
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Also, this will not cherry-pick A, but rather everything after A up to and including B. –  J. B. Rainsberger Nov 25 '12 at 2:01
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To include A just type git cherry-pick A^..B –  sschaef Feb 11 '13 at 19:20
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If you have git 1.7.1 or earlier and can't update, you can pretty quickly cherry-pick them in order by running git cherry-pick f~3 then git cherry-pick f~2 etc. up to git cherry-pick f (pressing the up arrow gets the previous command so I can quickly change the number and run it, should be similar in most consoles). –  David Mason Mar 28 at 5:59
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The simplest way to do this is with the onto option to rebase. Suppose that the branch which current finishes at a is called mybranch and this is the branch that you want to move c-f onto.

# checkout mybranch
git checkout mybranch

# reset it to f (currently includes a)
git reset --hard f

# rebase every commit after b and transplant it onto a
git rebase --onto a b
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Thank you! Could you also add git checkout secondbranch && git rebase mybranch for full answer –  tig Nov 4 '09 at 16:30
    
This answer helped me a lot to get my head around which commit is which in this scenario. And: you can use rebase's interactive mode, too. Thanks, @Charles! –  Oliver May 20 '13 at 13:11
    
The beauty of this approach is that you can use --interactive to remove some commits from the sequence or reorder them prior to the "cherry pick". +1 –  Michael Merickel Mar 21 at 20:00
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Or the requested one-liner:

git rebase --onto a b f
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If only for its brevity, this is the best answer. –  Nate Chandler Oct 23 '12 at 16:02
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git rev-list --reverse b..f | xargs -n 1 git cherry-pick
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Works perfect if there is no conflicts, otherwise "rebase onto" might be easier as you will not have to figure out where it has stopped and re-applying the rest of the patches. –  Ruslan Kabalin Oct 7 '11 at 11:37
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You can use a serial combination of git rebase and git branch to apply a group of commits onto another branch. As already posted by wolfc the first command actually copies the commits. However, the change is not visible until you add a branch name to the top most commit of the group.

Please open the picture in a new tab ...

Workflow

To summarize the commands in text form:

  1. Open gitk as a independent process using the command: git k --all &.
  2. Run git rebase --onto a b f.
  3. Press F5 in gitk. Nothing changes. But no HEAD is marked.
  4. Run git branch selection
  5. Press F5 in gitk. The new branch with its commits appears.

This should clarify things:

  • Commit a is the new root destination of the group.
  • Commit b is the commit before the first commit of the group (exclusive).
  • Commit f is the last commit of the group (inclusive).

Afterwards, you could use git checkout feature && git reset --hard b to delete the commits c till f from the feature branch.

In addition to this answer, I wrote a blog post which describes the commands in another scenario which should help to generally use it.

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git format-patch --full-index --binary --stdout range... | git am -3
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