Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have Nvidia Graphics card(GeForce GT 640) ON MY MOTHERBOARD. I have installed OpenCL on my box. When I query about platform using "clGetPlatformInfo(parameters)", I see the following output:- #Available platforms: 1. #1 CL_PLATFORM_NAME: NVIDIA CUDA #1 CL_PLATFORM_PROFILE: FULL_PROFILE #1 CL_PLATFORM_VERSION: OpenCL 1.1 CUDA 4.2.1 #1 CL_PLATFORM_VENDOR: NVIDIA Corporation

What should I infer from the above output? As per my understanding CUDA and OpenCL are two different platform. The output says total available platform is:1, platform name is CUDA and version is OpenCL and CUDA. I am to totally confused.

share|improve this question
    
The fact that clGetPlatformInfo queries the properties of an OpenCL platform and not some arbitrary unrelated information should be enough to infer that the queried platform actually is a valid OpenCL platform. In the end platform names and version strings can be completely arbitrary and in this case it just means that this platform is somehow related to CUDA (in this case bundled with and implemented by). – Christian Rau Jun 7 '13 at 12:33

NVIDIA's OpenCL platform is bundled with the CUDA toolkit, not to be confused with the CUDA programming language. You have version 4.2.1 of the CUDA toolkit which contains OpenCL 1.1. You can have more than one OpenCL platforms installed (Intel and AMD has their own platforms).

share|improve this answer
    
I got it.Thanks Erik – Rohit Sarewar May 23 '13 at 13:27
    
@RohitSarewar If that answer was the solution to your problem, accepting is the correct response. – Christian Rau Jun 7 '13 at 12:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.