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I have a memory leaks with this simple code using std::thread on Visual Studio Pro 2012:

#include <thread>

void f(){}

int main(){
    std::thread t(f);
    t.join();
    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
    return 0;}

Win32 Output:

Detected memory leaks!
Dumping objects ->
{293} normal block at 0x00A89520, 44 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 
Object dump complete.

x64 Output:

Detected memory leaks!
Dumping objects ->
{293} normal block at 0x00000000003FCB00, 72 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
Object dump complete.

If I comment the two first lines of the main method, I have no memory leaks.

Where does it come from ?

EDIT: The leak is still here with that code:

#include <thread>

void f(){}

int main(){
    {
        std::thread t(f);
        t.join();
    }
    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
    return 0;}
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

CrtDumpMemoryLeaks is notoriously unreliable. It may well be that the standard library intentionally leaks a one-time allocation when you first use std::thread. To find out if there's a real memory leak, try this:

for (int i = 0; i < LIMIT; ++i) {
  std::thread t(f); t.join();
}
_CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();

And then see if the leak size increases as you increase LIMIT. If it doesn't, you're fine.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, the leak does not increase with the number of threads launched. – Arnaud May 23 '13 at 10:32
    
@Arnaud Then it's probably a static one-time allocation and nothing to worry about. – Joachim Pileborg May 23 '13 at 10:42

When you dump the leaks the thread destructor has not yet run. You should try:

int main()
{
  {
    std::thread t(f);
    t.join();
  }
  _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought the same thing but the memory leaks is still here. – Arnaud May 23 '13 at 10:22
    
@Arnaud But you should edit the question with this version, anyway. In the one you posted it is not clear that these objects are no longer needed. – Daniel Daranas May 23 '13 at 10:30
    
@DanielDaranas I did it – Arnaud May 23 '13 at 10:40

Probably because the thread object allocates some data, and as the destructor hasn't run when you dump the memory it's counted as a leak.

Try putting the thread object, creation and join in a separate function.

share|improve this answer
    
It happens also if I put the thread part in a function: void g(){std::thread t(f);t.join();} – Arnaud May 23 '13 at 10:27

You're not supposed to call CrtDumpMemoryLeaks at that spot -- or if you do accept pseudo-leaks.

The destructors of static objects did not yet run, and such objects can sit on memory. If you use MFC it will run leak dump from dtor of AFX_STATE object that is notmally late enough to see only real leaks.

In the meantime you can use _crtBreakAlloc to see where that block is allocated, I bet the call stack will lead you to some function-local static in the RTL territory and you can even set a breakpoint on its dtor to see it actually releases the memory a little after your dump.

share|improve this answer

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