Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm writing a script and would like to know how to ask one of the commands to exit after few seconds. For eg. let's suppose my script runs 2 application commands in it.

#!/bin/bash

for i in `cat servers`
do
<command 1> $i >> Output_file  #Consistency command
<command 2> $i >> Output_file  #Communication check
done

These commands are to check consistency & communication to/from application. I want to know how do I make sure that command 1 & 2 runs for only few seconds and if there is no response from particular host, move on to next command.

Thanks

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Benjamin Gruenbaum, Old Pro, joonty, Emil, MMM May 24 '13 at 9:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
You seem to be looking for this: Timeout a command in bash without unnecessary delay –  devnull May 23 '13 at 11:34
    
I had a look @ that, isn't there an easier way?? I don't want to make my tiny script too complex! :) –  Marcos May 23 '13 at 19:07

1 Answer 1

bash coreutils has got 'timeout` command.

From manual:

DESCRIPTION

Start COMMAND, and kill it if still running after NUMBER seconds. SUFFIX may be "s" for seconds (the default), "m" for minutes, "h" for hours or "d" for days.

for example:

timeout 5 sleep 6

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying for rpcinfo on solaris... "timeout 5 rpcinfo -p server_name" it gives "command not found" , but there is man page entry for it. –  Marcos May 23 '13 at 11:20
1  
timeout isn't a bash built-in. It's provided by GNU coreutils. –  devnull May 23 '13 at 11:36
    
So how do I use it ?? –  Marcos May 23 '13 at 19:02
    
@Marcos not sure what you mean? See if you can install coreutils. If you can, then you should get timeout command. –  Chris May 23 '13 at 19:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.