Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I read two programs, both passing a polymorphic object reference to a method. I'm confused whether the method at runtime depends on the reference type or the actual object.

Program 1:

class A
{
    public void display()
    {
        System.out.println("A's display method");     
    }
}
class B extends A
{
    public void display()
    {
        System.out.println("In B's display method");
    }
}
class Displayer
{
    public void foo(A ob)
    {
        ob.display();
    }
}
class Tester
{
    public static void main(String ar[])
    {
        B ob=new B();
        Displayer ob1=new Displayer();
        ob1.foo(ob);
    }
}

Program 2:

class GameShape
{
    public void displayShape()
    {
        System.out.println("displaying shape);
    }
}
class PlayerPiece extends GameShape
{
    public void movepiece()
    {
        System.out.println("moving game piece");
    }
}
class TilePiece extends GameShape
{
    public void getAdjacent()
    {
        System.out.println("getting adjacent tiles");
    }
}
class TestShapes
{
    public static void main(String ar[])
    {
        PlayerPiece player = new PlayerPiece()
        TilePiece tile = new TilePiece()
        doShapes(player);
        doShapes(tile);
    }
    public static void doShapes(GameShape shape)
    {
        shape.displayShape();
    }
}

In program 1, the method runs based upon the actual object, while in program 2 the method runs based upon the reference type. I can't understand the difference between them.

A detailed explanation would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
There is no class by name GameShape in program 2. Is that a typo for Gamepiece ? – Vikas V May 23 '13 at 11:34
    
yes it was a typing err – Manas Gupta May 23 '13 at 11:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the second program it prints displaying shape because the base implementation of the method displayShape() is not overriden. The method is not implemented in the PlayerPiece class. Thus it inherits the behavior from its parent class, i.e. GameShape.

Edit your 2nd program as follows to get the desired results:

class PlayerPiece extends GameShape
{
    public void movepiece()
    {
        System.out.println("moving game piece");
    }

    public void displayShape()
    {
        System.out.println("Displaying player piece");
    }
}

Then your program would print : Displaying player piece

This technique is called as method overriding, where you implement the functionality of the method inherited from parent class in the child class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. So, if I have to decide which method shold run,first of all I should check if the moethod is overriden in its subclasses. And after that, should I see the reference type or the actual object type on the heap? – Manas Gupta May 23 '13 at 11:59
    
In overriding, the method to be called is decided on the basis of the actual object that is going to call the method and not the reference. – Rahul Bobhate May 23 '13 at 12:04

This is called method over riding in OOP.

  • When you call a method which is defined in both sub class and base class then it will invoke a method based on the object you are passing.

  • If the method is defined only in base class then it will invoke base class method irrespective to the object you are passing.

In your given example program1,display method is defined in both base and sub classes and you are trying to invoke it with the sub class object. So it will call subclass method

In the given example program2, displayShape method is defined only in base class. Though you call it with sub class object, it will run only base class implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply – Manas Gupta May 24 '13 at 22:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.