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This is not exactly a question. I think I invent new idioma - elegant way to say: Do something , if fail, try to fix it and do it again. If failed three times, give up. Is it looks good?

use strict;

write_file('lol');
write_file('abc');
write_file('def');
write_file('ijk');

my $depth;
sub write_file
{
  if ( $depth++ > 3 ) { die 'FAIL' };
  print FILE $depth.join ', ', @_  or open(FILE, '>log'), write_file(@_);
  $depth = 0;
}
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closed as not a real question by Borodin, Zaid, dgw, innaM, Óscar López May 23 '13 at 15:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
What on earth are you trying to do? Check if a file handle exists before printing to it? There are better ways. This will issue warnings, but I assume you are not using warnings (a very bad idea). –  TLP May 23 '13 at 12:26
2  
What kind of problem does it solve? –  Сухой27 May 23 '13 at 12:27
    
No warnigs in any case –  xoid May 23 '13 at 12:42
2  
I can see two problems here. (1) This is not a real question, as you correctly point out in the first sentence of your post. This makes it a bad fit for StackOverflow. (2) The idiom is not clear. If you are referring to the use of something that equates to private persistent variables (via closures or "globals"), then your claim to a new idiom is rendered void and null. –  Zaid May 23 '13 at 13:58
    
Your updated question is better for http://codereview.stackexchange.com/ –  ikegami May 23 '13 at 15:09

2 Answers 2

Any loop can be achieved with recursion. That doesn't mean that you should!

sub write_file
{
  my $tries = 3;  # Retries until it fails this many times.
  my $FILE;
  while (1) {
     open($FILE, '>>', 'log')
        and last;
     die $! if !--$tries;
  }

  print $FILE join(', ', @_);
}

But why do you think trying more than once is going to help? Failure to create a file is primarily caused by permission errors or because the directory in which you are trying to create the file doesn't exist. Trying more than once is not going to help in this case.


To answer your question anyway (since it's relevant in other scenarioes), pass the depth as an argument.

sub visit {
   my ($tree, $depth) = @_;
   $depth //= 0;

   ...
   visit($node, $depth+1);
   ...
}

visit($tree);
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@TLP, Fixed. The print was inside the loop at one point before I posted. –  ikegami May 23 '13 at 18:17

How about just opening the file for appending (>>) instead of using overwrite (>)? And you should not use "global" variables and global file handles in subroutines, that's just asking for trouble.

write_file('lol');
write_file('abc');
write_file('def');
write_file('ijk');

sub write_file {
    my $file = "log";
    open my $fh, ">>", $file or die "Cannot open '$file': $!";
    print $fh @_;
    close $fh;
}

Using a lexical file handle and three-argument open you ensure that your file handle is only open when you need it to be, and that the mode is what you want. Checking the return value of the open with die and error reporting $! is invaluable when debugging.

And no, the idiom is "If at first you fail, try, try again." :) And one might throw in a "and read the documentation" in there as well where perl is concerned.

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You open and close file every time you write. It is expensive. –  xoid May 23 '13 at 12:40
    
And, not, global vars is not evil. Indeed this $depth variable is local. It is declared just before function and not used outside of it. –  xoid May 23 '13 at 12:47
    
No, it is not that expensive. Perl is optimized for it. And yes, global vars are evil. Your var is scoped to the surrrounding block, or the file. Also, subs are not executed at runtime, but at compile time. –  TLP May 23 '13 at 14:23

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