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package com.bnpparibas.test;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

import org.junit.Test;

import com.bnpparibas.util.PendingUtil;

public class PendingTest {
    PendingUtil pendingUtil = new PendingUtil();
    boolean result;
    @Test
    public void fetchPendingWFFromDB()
    {
        result = pendingUtil.fetchPendingWFFromDB();
        assertTrue(result);
    }
    @Test
    public void runPendingBatch()
    {
        result = pendingUtil.runPendingBatch();
        assertTrue(result);
    }
    @Test
    public void checkQueuePostPendingRun()
    {
        result = pendingUtil.checkQueuePostPendingRun();
        assertTrue(result);
    }
}

above is my test case

public class PendingUtil {
public PendingUtil() 
    {
    try {
           System.out.println("In Const");
           }
catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
                     }
    }

above is my class called from JUnit test case.

in my test case i have on created object once..

PendingUtil pendingUtil = new PendingUtil();

but internally JUnit calls the constructor thrice !! ho is this possible.

share|improve this question
6  
This is simply how JUnit works: it creates a new instance for every individual test method to execute. – Mark Rotteveel May 23 '13 at 12:35
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could create the pendingUtil in a @BeforeClass method.

share|improve this answer
2  
It would have to be static then, so you might as well initialize it where it is done now. – Keppil May 23 '13 at 12:47
2  
+1 and the documentation may be found at junit.sourceforge.net/javadoc/org/junit/BeforeClass.html – rajah9 May 23 '13 at 12:48

You've annotated 3 methods with @Test. From the JUnit API doc on this annotation: To run the method, JUnit first constructs a fresh instance of the class then invokes the annotated method.

In short, the entire test class is instanced 3 times, and therefore, so is PendingUtil (once from each subsequent instance of the test class).

To do what you want, keep the property definition where it is, but assign the PendingUtil instance to it in a new method annotated with the @BeforeClass annotation.

Additionally, you could mark the property as static as suggested by vikingsteve.

share|improve this answer

Conversely if you do not want the PendingUtil to be called thrice you should probably write a TestUtil wrapper which probably just puts a Factory method in front of new PendingUtil() and only creates one instance.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems needlessly complicated. Alternative could be to make the property static and treat it as a singleton instance in a @Before method. – Mark Tielemans May 23 '13 at 12:42

You could make pendingUtil static

static PendingUtil pendingUtil = new PendingUtil();
share|improve this answer
    
No, you are right, of course. I removed the comment because it was obviously false. Thanks for notifying! – Mark Tielemans May 23 '13 at 13:00
    
@MarkTielemans no worries mark, removed my comment also :) – vikingsteve May 23 '13 at 13:01

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