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I don't understand why the ifft(fft(myFunction)) is not the same as my function. It seems to be the same shape but a factor of 2 out (ignoring the constant y-offset). All the documentation I can see says there is some normalisation that fft doesn't do, but that ifft should take care of that. Here's some example code below - you can see where I've bodged the factor of 2 to give me the right answer. Thanks for any help - its driving me nuts.

import numpy as np
import scipy.fftpack as fftp
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def fourier_series(x, y, wn, n=None):
    # get FFT
    myfft = fftp.fft(y, n)
    # kill higher freqs above wavenumber wn
    myfft[wn:] = 0
    # make new series
    y2 = fftp.ifft(myfft).real
    # find constant y offset
    myfft[1:]=0
    c = fftp.ifft(myfft)[0]
    # remove c, apply factor of 2 and re apply c
    y2 = (y2-c)*2 + c

    plt.figure(num=None)
    plt.plot(x, y, x, y2)
    plt.show()

if __name__=='__main__':
    x = np.array([float(i) for i in range(0,360)])
    y = np.sin(2*np.pi/360*x) + np.sin(2*2*np.pi/360*x) + 5

    fourier_series(x, y, 3, 360)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are killing the negative frequencies between 0 and -wn.

I think what you mean to do is to set myfft to 0 for all frequencies outside [-wn, wn].

Change the following line:

myfft[wn:] = 0

to:

myfft[wn:-wn] = 0
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Great - you are quite right. Thanks guys. I love how quickly people are able to respond on SO! –  nrob May 23 '13 at 14:24
    
Make sure to mark the question as answered if you are satisfied. –  M456 May 23 '13 at 14:27

You're removing half the spectrum when you do myfft[wn:] = 0. The negative frequencies are those in the top half of the array and are required.

You have a second fudge to get your results which is taking the real part to find y2: y2 = fftp.ifft(myfft).real (fftp.ifft(myfft) has a non-negligible imaginary part due to the asymmetry in the spectrum).

Fix it with myfft[wn:-wn] = 0 instead of myfft[wn:] = 0, and remove the fudges. So the fixed code looks something like:

import numpy as np
import scipy.fftpack as fftp
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

def fourier_series(x, y, wn, n=None):
    # get FFT
    myfft = fftp.fft(y, n)
    # kill higher freqs above wavenumber wn
    myfft[wn:-wn] = 0
    # make new series
    y2 = fftp.ifft(myfft)

    plt.figure(num=None)
    plt.plot(x, y, x, y2)
    plt.show()

if __name__=='__main__':
    x = np.array([float(i) for i in range(0,360)])
    y = np.sin(2*np.pi/360*x) + np.sin(2*2*np.pi/360*x) + 5

    fourier_series(x, y, 3, 360)

It's really worth paying attention to the interim arrays that you are creating when trying to do signal processing. Invariably, there are clues as to what is going wrong that should direct you to the problem. In this case, you taking the real part masked the problem and made your task more difficult.

Just to add another quick point: Sometimes taking the real part of the resultant array is exactly the correct thing to do. It's often the case that you end up with an imaginary part to the signal output which is just down to numerical errors in the input to the inverse FFT. Typically this manifests itself as very small imaginary values, so taking the real part is basically the same array.

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