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Imagine I have the following structure:

DECLARE @Products TABLE (
    MemberId INT,
    ProductId INT,
    GlobalProductId INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (MemberId, ProductId));
INSERT INTO @Products VALUES (1, 1, NULL);--this is my "global product"
INSERT INTO @Products VALUES (2, 1, NULL);--this is okay
INSERT INTO @Products VALUES (2, 2, 1);--this is okay
INSERT INTO @Products VALUES (2, 3, 2);--this should fail
SELECT * FROM @Products;

The rule I want to enforce is that MemberId = 1 holds global products and all other MemberIds hold normal products. A set of normal products can be linked to a single global product.

So I want the ability for a Member's Product to be linked to a Global Product, i.e. there would be a foreign key constraint that if the GlobalProductId isn't NULL then there should exist a ProductId that matches the GlobalProductId where the MemberId = 1.

In my example above I have one global product with a ProductId = 1. Then I create three normal products:

  • the first has no global product;
  • the second is linked to the single global product I created earlier (then I could link further products to the same global product);
  • the third should fail as I have linked it to a global product that doesn't exist, i.e. this script will return nothing:

    SELECT * FROM @Products WHERE MemberId = 1 AND ProductId = 2;
    

I can see that the simplest solution would be to create a new table to hold nothing but Global Products. The problem with this approach is that I have a whole set of routines to load, update, delete data from the Product table and a second set of routines to perform calculations, etc. from the same table. If I were to introduce a new "Global Products" table then I would have to duplicate dozens of UDFs to achieve this and my code would become much more complicated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add a computed column that's fixed as 1 and then add a foreign key:

CREATE TABLE Products (
    MemberId INT,
    ProductId INT,
    GlobalProductId INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (MemberId, ProductId),
    GlobalMemberId AS 1 PERSISTED,
    FOREIGN KEY (GlobalMemberId,GlobalProductID)
        references Products (MemberId,ProductID)
    );
INSERT INTO Products VALUES (1, 1, NULL);--this is my "global product"
INSERT INTO Products VALUES (2, 1, NULL);--this is okay
INSERT INTO Products VALUES (2, 2, 1);--this is okay
INSERT INTO Products VALUES (2, 3, 2);--this should fail
SELECT * FROM Products;

This produces these results:

Msg 547, Level 16, State 0, Line 1

The INSERT statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY SAME TABLE constraint "FK__Products__7775B2CE". The conflict occurred in database "abc", table "dbo.Products".

The statement has been terminated.

MemberId    ProductId   GlobalProductId GlobalMemberId
----------- ----------- --------------- --------------
1           1           NULL            1
2           1           NULL            1
2           2           1               1
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Yes, yes, yes, yes... that would work!! Many thanks :D –  Richard Hansell May 23 '13 at 14:21

Why not just add a CHECK constraint:

ALTER TABLE Products ADD CONSTRAINT CHK_ColumnD_GlobalProductId 
CHECK (GlobalProductId IS NULL AND MemberId = 1 
       OR GlobalProductId IS NOT NULL AND MemberId != 1);

and a FOREIGN KEY:

ALTER TABLE Products ADD CONSTRAINT fk_SelfProducts
FOREIGN KEY (GlobalProductId )
REFERENCES Products (ProductId)
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Is this meant to be a joke? That does nothing to help as it just enforces a rule that there must be no global product or it must have an Id of 1. As soon as I add a second global product I would need to go back and add this to my constraint??!! –  Richard Hansell Sep 10 '14 at 10:14
    
Updated the answer –  Bulat Sep 10 '14 at 10:30

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