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I try to find out the performance or internal implementation for WAITFOR in T-SQL, have gone through MSDN and Stackoverflow and other sites without luck, here is my question

For below code, I want to delete the top 10,000 rows from table DUMMY. I want to make this delete job have the least performance impact on the database's other jobs as possible and give priority to others (if any). So I make it delete 100 rows at a time and do it 100 times with sleep time in two adjacent deletes.

Question:

  1. During the WAITFOR blocking time, will this transaction consume CPU or just idle and waiting for kicked up by some event 1 second later?

  2. During that 1 sec, if there are other transactions trying to INSERT/UPDATE on the DUMMY table, who gets priority?

Really appreciate your help or any insights for this

declare @cnt int 
set @cnt = 0
while @cnt < 100
begin
  delete top 100 from DUMMYTABLE where FOO = 'BAR'
  set @cnt = @cnt + 1
  waitfor delay '00:00:01'
end
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For point 2, it depends on whether you've shown us the whole code - if the code is running inside a transaction, that changes everything –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 23 '13 at 14:50
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever thanks for pointing out, it is not in a BEGIN TRAN ... COMMIT block, just tsql wrapped in perl. –  Ted Xu May 23 '13 at 15:19
    
If you really want to minimise impact, make sure there is an index on FOO –  Nick.McDermaid May 23 '13 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted
  • It does not consume any CPU
  • Status = suspended

You can see this with 2 query windows:

SELECT @@SPID;
GO
WAITFOR DELAY '000:03:00'; -- three minutes

Then in the other

SELECT * FROM sys.sysprocesses S WHERE S.spid = 53; -- replace 53

Note: SQL Server 2012 SP1 but AFAIK behaviour is the same

Point 2, sorry missed this

Another session will modify the table while the WAITFOR is running. It isn't a lock.

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thank you gbn, your answer and experiment are so helpful! don't know we can do something like this before. thanks a lot! –  Ted Xu May 23 '13 at 15:17

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