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I realize this question could be processor dependent, but hopefully someone can point me in the right direction. For the life of me, I cannot figure out how to convert an unsigned long long int representing nanoseconds to a double representing seconds in C (I'm using a 32-bit big-endian PowerPC 405 for this particular test, and a GNU C99 compiler).

I've tried:

unsigned long long int nanoseconds = 1234567890LLU;
double nanoseconds_d = nanoseconds*1e-9;

Also:

nanoseconds_d = ((double) nanoseconds)*1e-9;

For both cases, I just get 0. What am I doing wrong here?

EDITED TO ADD FULL EXAMPLE

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int
main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    unsigned long long int nanoseconds = 1234567890LLU;
    double nanoseconds_d = nanoseconds * 1e-9;
    printf("%g\n", nanoseconds_d);

    return 0;
}

MAKEFILE

SRCS    = simple.c    
INCLUDE := -I$(PWD)            
CFLAGS  := -O0 -g3 -Wall -fmessage-length=0 -mhard-float -fsigned-char -D_REENTRANT
LIBS    := -lc

OBJS = $(SRCS:.c=.o)
PROG = $(SRCS:.c=).out

all: $(PROG)

$(PROG): $(OBJS)
    @echo "Linking object files with output."
    $(CC) -o $(PROG) $(OBJS) $(LIBS)
    @echo "Linking complete."

$(OBJS): $(SRCS)
    @echo "Starting compilation."
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) $(INCLUDE) -c $<
    @echo "Compilation complete."   

clean::
    @$(RM) *.o *.out
share|improve this question
2  
Works fine here. What is the nonsense value, and how are you printing it? –  larsmans May 23 '13 at 14:45
2  
You might have stumbled on a compiler bug. Converting a 64-bit unsigned value to double would be done with a sequence of several instructions (as opposed to just one) and this little-used sequence would be wrong in at least some cases for your compiler. As a test/workaround, try summing the results of two conversions 32-bit -> double. –  Pascal Cuoq May 23 '13 at 14:54
    
Pascal, I think you're on to something. It works fine if I sum two long ints and then convert to double. –  shansen May 23 '13 at 14:59
    
Please show us this "nonsense value". –  Keith Thompson May 23 '13 at 15:13
    
I have been unable to duplicate the nonsense value, which is the reason I have not posted it. I am getting 0 for every conversion I try. The nonsense value must have been a typo or something, apologies. –  shansen May 23 '13 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

Works here when using %g to print

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(){
    unsigned long long int nanoseconds = 1234567890LLU;
    double nanoseconds_d = nanoseconds*1e-9;
    printf("%g\n", nanoseconds_d);

    nanoseconds_d = ((double) nanoseconds)*1e-9;
    printf("%g\n", nanoseconds_d);
}

outputs

1.23457
1.23457
share|improve this answer
    
I just copied and pasted your code, and I get 0 for both cases! Strange... –  shansen May 23 '13 at 14:55

It turns out that the version of cross gcc I was using had a bug that had to do with soft vs. hard floating point. Therefore, the cast from unsigned long long to double wasn't working properly, causing the issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
Which gcc version did you experience this bug? –  Patrick Aug 20 '13 at 20:40

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