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I can not get this loop to stop even though I set the count variable = to false. And it won't go to the next method called in the Main class. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Main Class

public class Main {


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Var V = new Var();
        End E = new End();

        V.enter();
        E.end();

    }

}

Var Class

public class Var {

    static int x = 0;
    static boolean count = true;


    public static void enter(){

        while (count = true ){
            x = x+10;
            System.out.println(x);
            count = false;
        }
    }

}
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closed as too localized by Brian Roach, Raedwald, tkanzakic, flup, chollida May 25 '13 at 12:42

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6  
Your assignment of count = true instead of the comparison count == true means that you effectively just have while (true), thus resulting in an infinite loop. –  Quetzalcoatl May 23 '13 at 16:02
    
The usual trick that helps avoid this kind of errors is to put the constant on the left hand side of the operator, like so: while (true == count). If you use the assignment operator = instead of the comparison operator == by mistake the compiler will tell you that right away, detecting an attempt to assign a value to a constant. –  mustaccio May 23 '13 at 16:05
    
@mustaccio No, it's not. The correct way to do this in Java is while(count) - there is absolutely no reason to compare it to anything. –  Brian Roach May 24 '13 at 21:59
    
@Brian Roach: "The correct way"? According to who? –  mustaccio May 25 '13 at 0:28
    
Anyone with common sense? Why would you add a redundant and useless comparison? Why even introduce the possibility of accidentally typing = instead of == and triggering a compiler error? Please, explain why that is a good idea and the proper approach over simply evaluating the boolean which eliminates the issue entirely. –  Brian Roach May 25 '13 at 4:00

6 Answers 6

replace

while (count = true ){

with

while (count == true ){

or simply

while(count){
   ...
}
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The reason for this is that count = true assigns the value of true to the variable count which then returns the value true to the while-loop and thus going infinite since even if it was false, it'd now become true. This is basically the same as @ Quetzalcoatl comment. –  ArtB May 23 '13 at 16:07
    
The better answer would be while (count) { ... } ; there is no reason to compare it to anything in Java. –  Brian Roach May 24 '13 at 22:00
    
I wanted the author to see that he was doing the assignation. I edited the answer to add this solution. Thanks –  Arnaud Denoyelle May 25 '13 at 11:52

Change

while (count = true) {

to

while (count) {

The expression count = true is an assignment, not a comparison, which would use a relational operator. The result of an assignment expression is the assigned value, which in this case is always true.

Comparing a boolean expression to a boolean literal (that is, count == true or ((x && y) || z) == false) is ugly and confusing. Just use the expression itself (count or !((x && y) || z)).

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Even this should work as count is already boolean. single equal to in while (count =true ){ causes count to changed to true? `

 public class Var {

    static int x = 0;
    static boolean count = true;


    public static void enter(){

        while (count  ){
            x = x+10;
            System.out.println(x);
            count = false;
        }
    }

}
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The line while (count = true) uses the assignment operator, not the equality operator. The assignment operator returns the variable's value after assignment - in this case, true (reference).

At run time, the result of the assignment expression is the value of the variable after the assignment has occurred. The result of an assignment expression is not itself a variable.

So your loop is effectively this:

while (true){
    count = true;
    x = x+10;
    System.out.println(x);
    count = false;
}

To fix this you can use the equality operator == or just while (count). The latter is better style, but both work.

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change

while (count = true) {

to

while (count == true) {
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while (count = true ){
            x = x+10;
            System.out.println(x);
            count = false;
        }

in here you use count = true. it is a asign operation which will always return true.

So you count == true to compare.

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