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I have a code:

<ul class='mates'>
  <li class='m' id='1'>Jakub</li>
  <li class='f' id='2'>Vinnie</li>
  <li class='m' id='3'>David</li>
</ul>

This script selects one of the 'li' elements, according to users input:

<script>
var mates = document.getElementsByClassName('mates')[0];
for (var i=0; i< mates.childNodes.length; i++){
    if(mates.children[i].innerHTML == 'Vinnie') alert("Got you! ID "+mates.children[i].id)
}
</script>

And I need to remove this element:

<script>
var mates = document.getElementsByClassName('mates')[0];
for (var i=0; i< mates.childNodes.length; i++){
    if(mates.children[i].innerHTML == 'Vinnie') {
        alert("Got you! ID "+mates.children[i].id);

        parent = document.getElementsByClassName('mates');
        mateToDelete = mates.children[i];

        parent.removeChild(mateToDelete);
    }
}
</script>

This is what I tried in several different ways but I always got error, e.g. " Cannot call method 'removeChild' of undefined". Any ideas?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by kapa Jul 8 '14 at 8:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Do note that childNodes includes text nodes, such as newlines and indentation. Perhaps you should use mates.children instead. –  Asad May 23 '13 at 16:12
    
If you can use jQuery, when you find the element, just use element.remove() –  DmitryK May 23 '13 at 16:13
1  
note the "s" in getElementsByClassName this indicates that it returns a node list not a single node. So when you call parent.removeChild(mateToDelete) you are attempting the remove on a list. –  scrappedcola May 23 '13 at 16:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You already have the parent node from your original getElementsByClassName, and you have your child through the loop that you've just performed.

As such, it's simple:

for (var i=0; i< mates.childNodes.length; i++){
  if(mates.children[i].innerHTML == 'Vinnie'){
    alert("Got you! ID "+mates.children[i].id)
    mates.removeChild(mates.children[i]);
    break;
  }
}

For the sake of completeness (and to prevent further arguing in comments :P), if you are in fact potentially deleting multiple "Vinnie"'s from your list, then it would be better to make a list of those children you want to delete, then delete them after like so:

var toDelete=[],
    i;

for (i=0; i< mates.childNodes.length; i++){
  if(mates.children[i].innerHTML == 'Vinnie'){
    alert("Got you! ID "+mates.children[i].id)
    toDelete.push(mates.children[i]);
  }
}

for (i=0; i<toDelete.length; i++){
  mates.removeChild(toDelete[i]);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
@Asad That's why the break is there after the delete. –  slinky2000 May 23 '13 at 16:16
    
@slinky2000 Yes, I've already deleted my comment. –  Asad May 23 '13 at 16:17
    
The break may not be required. What if the case arises that there are two "mates" named Vinnie? Suggest adding a comment to your code to say that it will only match on one occurrence of "Vinnie". –  Michael Coxon May 23 '13 at 16:19
    
@MichaelCoxon In that case, the identified nodes should be pushed into an array and deleted after the loop. –  Asad May 23 '13 at 16:20
    
@MichaelCoxon The question isn't about that. –  slinky2000 May 23 '13 at 16:21

You don't need that parent variable. Delete it using this:

mates.removeChild(mateToDelete);

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3XeM5/2/

I also modified your for-loop to use:

for (var i=0; i< mates.children.length; i++){ 

The length of this (children.length) is 3, the length of childNodes is 7, so if nothing is found the loop will break!

Edit: If you want to delete multiple iterations of a specific element, remove the break; in the if-logic. If you're only looking for the first, leave the break.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems it does work. But how so? MDN says parent node is needed here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/… –  Jan Turoň May 23 '13 at 16:26
    
You already have a variable that contains the children of what you want. There is no need to declare a second variable. –  tymeJV May 23 '13 at 16:27

Use This:

mates.removeChild(mates.children[i]);

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/t9nCT/1/

share|improve this answer

You're retrieving a collection, so do,

parent[0].removeChild(mateToDelete);
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to use the parent object created because it already exists as "mates". –  Michael Coxon May 23 '13 at 16:16
    
How's my answer wrong though? I will/would edit it at some point, just getting a quick answer in –  ta-run May 23 '13 at 16:18
2  
I am only a beginner at SO, so correct me if I am wrong, but isn't good practice and solid code in the first place better than "just getting a quick answer in"? –  Michael Coxon May 23 '13 at 16:33
    
@MichaelCoxon well you are correct, partly my mistake as well, didn't read the code completely. But, generally, people get an answer in and tend to improve on that :) Also, only wrong answers are downvoted afaik, partly right answers are given comments to improve on –  ta-run May 23 '13 at 17:06

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