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I have a byte array:

byte data[2]

I want to to keep the 7 less significant bits from the first and the 3 most significant bits from the second. I do this:

unsigned int the=((data[0]<<8 | data[1])<<1)>>6;

Can you give me a hint why this does not work? If I do it in different lines it works fine.

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@chris No, integer promotions. It's UB if byte is signed and data[0] < 0. –  Daniel Fischer May 23 '13 at 16:16
    
@DanielFischer, Good point, I forgot about that. Tricky language is tricky :p –  chris May 23 '13 at 16:16
    
so it is the casting i suppose that i miss? –  kyrpav May 23 '13 at 16:17
    
What is the error message? –  Shafik Yaghmour May 23 '13 at 16:18
    
@rahulmaindargi No, two open, two closed. –  Daniel Fischer May 23 '13 at 16:19
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Can you give me a hint why this does not work?

Hint:

You have two bytes and want to preserve 7 less significant bits from the first and the 3 most significant bits from the second:

data[0]: -xxxxxxx    data[1]: xxx-----

-'s represent bits to remove, x's represent bits to preserve.

After this

(data[0]<<8 | data[1])<<1

you have:

the: 00000000 0000000- xxxxxxxx xx-----0

Then you make >>6 and result is:

the: 00000000 00000000 00000-xx xxxxxxxx

See, you did not remove high bit from data[0].

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Keep the 7 less significant bits from the first and the 3 most significant bits from the second.

Assuming the 10 bits to be preserved should be the LSB of the unsigned int value, and should be contiguous, and that the 3 bits should be the LSB of the result, this should do the job:

unsigned int value = ((data[0] & 0x7F) << 3) | ((data[1] & 0xE0) >> 5);

You might not need all the masking operands; it depends in part on the definition of byte (probably unsigned char, or perhaps plain char on a machine where char is unsigned), but what's written should work anywhere (16-bit, 32-bit or 64-bit int; signed or unsigned 8-bit (or 16-bit, or 32-bit, or 64-bit) values for byte).

Your code does not remove the high bit from data[0] at any point — unless, perhaps, you're on a platform where unsigned int is a 16-bit value, but if that's the case, it is unusual enough these days to warrant a comment.

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