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Essentially what I'm trying to do is count the number of rows something doesn't exist in an audit/history table. I'd like the following query to return a count of one per detail. Currently it gives me one per row in the history table.

--Detail Table
ID    DETAIL_GROUP
1     A
2     B
3     B

--Detail History Table
DETAIL_ID_FK    VALUE1
1               NOT_MATCH
1               NOT_MATCH
2               MATCH
2               NOT_MATCH
3               MATCH
3               NOT_MATCH

SELECT D.DETAIL_GROUP, COUNT(*)
FROM DETAIL D
WHERE (NOT EXISTS(
          SELECT NULL
          FROM DETAIL_HISTORY HI 
          WHERE HI.D_ID_FK = D.ID 
          AND HI.VALUE1 = 'MATCH'))
GROUP BY D.DETAIL_GROUP; 

I'd like to see the following result:

DETAIL_GROUP    COUNT(*)
A               1

but I'm receiving the following result:

DETAIL_GROUP    COUNT(*)
A               2

Thank you in advance for any assistance provided.

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7  
With your sample you provided, I am getting the result A, 1 which is what you stated you want -- see this demo -- sqlfiddle.com/#!3/013a0/1 –  bluefeet May 23 '13 at 17:59
    
side note, You should avoid correlated subqueries, they're expensive. Use where D.ID not in (select HI.D_ID_FK from DETAIL_HISTORY HI where HI.VALUE1 = 'MATCH') –  τεκ May 23 '13 at 18:12
3  
@τεκ There are certain problems with NOT IN and nulls. See NOT IN vs NOT EXISTS Performance depends on the DBMS. Are you sure that Oracle does not perform well with correlated subqueries? –  ypercube May 23 '13 at 19:59
    
I think it's reasonable to assume that D_ID_FK is not null in this context. I read some blog post about correlated subqueries in Oracle some time ago, though I don't know how good Oracle's optimizer is these days. –  τεκ May 23 '13 at 20:04
    
Thank you for the responses. I found my issue and it had nothing to do with this query. What should I do with this post? –  Pranke May 24 '13 at 11:09

1 Answer 1

Assuming that your detail table is as follows:

D_ID    VALUE1
1       MATCH
1       NOT_MATCH
2       MATCH
2       NOT_MATCH
3       MATCH
3       NOT_MATCH

The below query:

SELECT d.detail_group, count(*)
FROM detail d
JOIN detail_history dh ON dh.d_id = d.id 
WHERE dh.value1 = 'MATCH'
GROUP BY d.detail_group

Would produce:

DETAIL_GROUP    COUNT(*)
A                   1
B                   2

The above query creates the groups matching the ids and then goes into each group and restricts the items based on value1.

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