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I'm trying to parse a string expression (i.e. "6+10*2-5") and calculate the answer as a double using a for-case statement. However I'm getting the error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: ""
    at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(NumberFormatException.java:48)
    at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Integer.java:470)
    at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Integer.java:499)
    at Calculator.random(Calculator.java:50)
    at Calculator.main(Calculator.java:210)

any ideas?

public static double random(String exp) {
    double primeResult = 0;
    for (int i=0; i<exp.length();i++) {
        double left = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0,i));
        double right = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1,i+2));
        switch(exp.charAt(i)) {
            case '*':
            primeResult = left * right;
            break;
        case '/':
            primeResult = left / right;
            break;
        case '+':
            primeResult = left + right;
            break;
        case '-':
            primeResult = left - right;
            break;
        default:
            return 0;
        }
        System.out.println(primeResult);
        }
        return primeResult;
    }
}
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Unless you have to do it that way, a ScriptingEngine would do that for you in fewer lines and more reliably. –  assylias May 23 '13 at 18:48
1  
You need to understand that this technique will give the wrong answer even when you fix this problem, because you aren't handling operator precedence. You will evalulate it as ((6+10)*2)-5 rather than (6+(10*2))-5. Basically there is nothing here that corresponds to your description 'trying to parse a string expression'. All you're doing is scanning it, incorrectly. You need to look up recursive descent expression parsing, the Dijkstra 'shunting-yard algorith', etc., or use the ScriptingEngine as @assylias suggests. –  EJP May 24 '13 at 1:43

2 Answers 2

Your problem has nothing to do with switch/case. The problem is simply that you're trying to parse an empty string as a number. Work out why you've got an empty string, then fix it. (Hint: what do you expect exp.substring(0, 0) to return?)

You should also consider what you expect exp.substring(i+1,i+2) to return when i is exp.length() - 1 (or even exp.length() - 2).

Also, take a step back and consider why you thought this was a problem with the switch/case part. Look at the stack trace - it's not even within the switch/case statement, but before it. It's very important to be able to diagnose where errors are actually occurring, so you can focus on that and not get distracted by irrelevant parts.

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I'm calling the method from the main using random("5+5") –  user2297666 May 23 '13 at 18:46
1  
@user2297666: Yes, but you're trying to parse exp.substring(0, i) - including when i is 0. –  Jon Skeet May 23 '13 at 18:47
    
Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1,i+2)); –  Tees Maar Khan May 23 '13 at 18:47
    
@seeta: Yes, that will be a problem as well - but that's not what caused the original exception. –  Jon Skeet May 23 '13 at 18:49
    
+1 especially for the last paragraph on diagnosing errors. –  Andrew Martin May 23 '13 at 18:52

Jon Skeet has answered your question with very good diagnostic training.

But... I do think your solution to your problem will not work.

If you mentally trace through your code, assuming a proper input of "5+5", the first thing your loop will do is this:

double left = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0,i));
double right = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(i+1,i+2));

With i==0 (first time through the loop), this will translate to:

double left = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0,0));
double right = Integer.parseInt(exp.substring(0+1,0+2));

This will IMMEDIATELY get an "empty string" for exp.substring(0,0), which throws the exception in your question.

Oh, and why is your function called "random" if you're evaluating an expression?

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