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Answers to other questions say this is how to write assignment for a derived class:

class D : public B
{
public:
    D& operator=(const D& other)
    {
        B::operator=(other);
        // D-specific stuff
        return *this;
    }
};

But shouldn't the usual "check for self assignment" be done? Eg:

class D : public B
{
public:
    D& operator=(const D& other)
    {
        if ( this != &other ) {
            B::operator=(other);
            // D-specific stuff
        }
        return *this;
    }
};

Or maybe the base class assignment should be left out of the check?

share|improve this question
    
"But shouldn't the usual "check for self assignment be done?" - should – kotlomoy May 23 '13 at 19:28
2  
I would follow the copy-swap-idiom for assignment. – andre May 23 '13 at 19:33
    
What does copy-swap look like for a derived class? – John H. May 23 '13 at 19:40
    
@JohnH.: The same as in any other case. Your swap function simply calls swap for all members (including the base class) – Grizzly May 23 '13 at 19:45

Warning - the following may sound a bit hard-line.

But shouldn't the usual "check for self assignment" be done?

Emphatically, no.

Consider the circumstances under which self-assignment would occur. Something as contrived as:

D d;
d = d;

But the above code is flawed, and should never have been written in the first place. It's the same idea as having a global catch (...) intended to catch all unhandled exceptions. If that global catch-all is going to try to continue on as if nothing had happened, all that you are going to get is a nightmare. You won't prevent the program from crashing or doing something even worse (like killing the patient or selling when you should have bought 10k shares of IBM), you just prevented it from crashing right now.

Self-assignment, as in the code sample above, is similarly flawed. Checking for self-assignment and continuing on as if nothing had happened is just sticking your head in he sand, pretending everything is just peachy. The reality is, there is a bug in your code that needs to be fixed.

If self-assignment should never occur, it should (could) be an assertion. It should not just roll along. Find and fix the bug that causes self-assignment. Don't code around it.

share|improve this answer
1  
More importantly than blocking self assignment is making sure your code would work even if self assigned: there are few bugs that are self-assignment only, but many relatively obscure bugs show up in self-assignment reliably. – Yakk May 23 '13 at 19:39
    
Note that modern typical implementations of the assignment operator (ie. either the default one or copy-and-swap) have no problem other than efficiency on self-assignments. – Alexandre C. May 23 '13 at 19:40
    
So you are saying that d = d shouldn't work? That would really go against the principle of least suprise (It's not what int does). Besides it isn't necessarily something as contrieved as your example, particulary if you consider that the arguments might come from out of different pointers. Now you could code around that or specify for each algorithm that it doesn't work in cases of pointer aliasing, but that only serves to make everything more complex (there is nothing inheritly wrong with code involving self assignment). – Grizzly May 23 '13 at 19:57
    
@Grizzly: That's not exactly what I'm saying. What I'm saying is, if self-assignment would cause a problem and you expect it to never happen, then you should not check for it at run-time. You should possibly assert for it, possibly unit test it, and let the program die if it does happen at run-time. – John Dibling May 23 '13 at 20:00
    
I'm not following, exactly. At first I thought you were saying self-assignment should never occur, so operator= should always check for and reject it. But then your last paragraph starts "If self-assignment should never occur", implying that it is ok sometimes. – John H. May 23 '13 at 20:00

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