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I have the name of a function in a variable, but everything is within a closure. With this variable I want to call the function, something like this

(function(func) {
      this[func]() ;         // doesn't work

      function bar() {}
      function foo() {}
})('bar') ;

Is something like this possible or should I, for example, add the functions to a variable, like

(function(func) {        
      var ns = {
          bar: function() {},
          foo: function() {}
      };

      ns[func]() ;         // OK
})('bar') ;
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Gordon May 23 '13 at 21:33

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Your code makes no sense. What exactly are you trying to achieve? – Kirill Ivlev May 23 '13 at 19:42
4  
@Kirill Makes perfect sense. How do you call foo or bar in the first example using a "variable function" name? E.g. window[foo]() works fine in the global scope, this[foo]() doesn't. – deceze May 23 '13 at 19:43
2  
this inside the closure is nothing else but window object. You'd better use the second approach. – VisioN May 23 '13 at 19:43
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Variables and functions declared in the current lexical scope cannot be accessed by name using [] syntax - only property keys (per your second example) can be looked up dynamically based on the contents of another variable.

The only way around this is to resort to eval, which is almost never a good idea.

An exception applies for variables and functions declared in the global scope - those are actually properties of window.

share|improve this answer
    
... Half-true. See my answer. – svidgen May 23 '13 at 19:54
    
@svidgen in your answer you have not declared a lexically scoped function, you have added a property to an object. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 19:56
    
Are you suggesting that you can't create lexically scoped variables/functions in an object? Or that the logical leap from exposing a lexical "member" is too great? ... – svidgen May 23 '13 at 19:59
    
no, I'm saying that your answer doesn't appear to be remotely relevant. The OP wanted to call a lexically scoped function by name from within that scope, where the name itself is a variable. It can't be done without eval. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:04
    
or by using property names, per his second code block. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:11

In my experience, putting a function inside a closure is one way of declaring it "private" - such that nothing outside can access it. Furthermore, it's worth looking at the way code is minified:

Before:

(function() {
    function privateFn(var1, var2) {
        //TODO
    }
    return {
        publicFn: function() { }
    }
})();

After:

(function() {
    function _a(_0, _1) {

    }
    return {
        publicFn: function() { }
    }
})();

Notice how privateFn doesn't really exist anymore? The minifier knows, by definition of the language, that nothing can access that function outside - by name, or otherwise. You seem to want to make one of your functions public.

share|improve this answer
2  
OP wants to access the function from inside the closure. – Denys Séguret May 23 '13 at 19:53
    
@dystroy He still got a point there. If he minifies his code, it will break because the minifier won't "rename" his string. – Zyrius May 23 '13 at 19:54
    
@Derija93 minification and strings as property keys don't mix, you have to tell the minifier which functions not to rename. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 19:57
    
@Alnitak That's true and definitely something Katana314 should have mentioned. – Zyrius May 23 '13 at 20:01
    
@Derija93 in any event, a minifier won't touch the name of properties, so for lexically scoped variables it doesn't matter because the only way to access them using a variable-as-name is using eval. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:07

Something like this:

(new function() {
    this.a = function(x) {
        document.getElementById('out').innerHTML += x;
    }
})['a']('boom.');

http://jsfiddle.net/CT4du/1/

A closure keeps everything private. And normally, this in a closure just refers to the window. But, you can "publicize" items in a "closure" without polluting the global space by turning it into an anonymous object first. This allows you to make one and only one method call on the object before it vanishes ...

You can do normal object things, like use private, lexical variables and expose only the methods you want exposed.

(new function() {

    var a = function(x) { document.getElementById('out').innerHTML += x; }
    var b = function() { a(d); }
    var c = function() { /* ... */ }
    var d = "whatever";

    // expose two of them .. 
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;

})['a']('boom.');
share|improve this answer
1  
The link with the question isn't clear. – Denys Séguret May 23 '13 at 19:54
    
@dystroy What do you mean? – svidgen May 23 '13 at 19:56
1  
your code provides no advantage over the OP's second proposed code block, which works perfectly. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:09
1  
@svidgen I disagree. The OP's second code block is perfectly understandable, and could trivially be extended to include some lexically scoped variables, and all without needing to remember to call new to allow use of this. Like Derija93, I think his version is simpler, and it's just as flexible! – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:14
1  
oh, and this in a closure can be (and often is) any variable - this depends on how the closure is invoked. Only in an IIFE would it default to window. – Alnitak May 23 '13 at 20:18

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