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Consider this example:

 Memo1.Clear;
 Memo1.Add(S);
 Memo1.SaveToFile(F);

If it were in JavaScript, we could do that:

 Memo1.Clear.Add(S).SaveToFile(F);  

How can I write my own Delphi classes to support chaining method calls like that? I'd like to be able to write code like this:

 MyFileClass.Create('File.txt').OpenForWrite().Add('Test');
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1  
No, there is no such built-in capability in Delphi. There are some libraries which do this however, such as OTL (Omni Thread Library). It's accomplished by making all functions in an object return its self. For example function TMyObject.DoSomething(Param: String): TMyObject; –  Jerry Dodge May 23 '13 at 19:46
    
I believe what you're looking for is known as 'duck typing'. There was a library to support this in Delphi around the time of XE2 release, but I don't believe it's been updated (and last time I tried it, it didn't work on XE3). I would be very interested in this as well, but unfortunately, as @JerryDodge says, it's not available in Delphi by default. –  Scott Pritchard May 23 '13 at 19:51
    
You should read some introductory text, really. Your JavaScript stylization makes absolutely no sense. –  OnTheFly May 23 '13 at 19:52
1  
A quick read of the documentation would have told you this isn't possible. Memo1.Clear is a procedure, so it has no return value, Memo1 has no Add method (its Lines do, but it returns an integer that is the index into Lines). In order for your method chaining to work, each call would have to return an instance of Memo1, and all of the above clearly shows that they don't. –  Ken White May 23 '13 at 20:01
2  
Sadly we can't return values from a constructor Er, what do you mean? A constructor is a function that returns an instance of the class of which it is a member. –  David Heffernan May 23 '13 at 20:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can readily design your own classes to support a fluent style, should you so desire.

type
  TMyClass = class
  public
    function Foo: TMyClass;
    function Bar: TMyClass;
  end;

procedure TMyClass.Foo: TMyClass;
begin
  // do something
  Result := Self;
end;

var
  obj: TMyClass;

....
obj.Foo.Bar;

For many types, the fluent style is not appropriate, so don't feel you have to use it everywhere. However, for some types it can make good sense.

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3  
+1, but also want to note that using this style makes maintenance considerably more difficult and debugging a nightmare, so it should be used very sparingly. –  Ken White May 23 '13 at 20:18
    
@KenWhite I've personally never written such a class. However, I was using one the other way writing an expectation based NUnit test case to describe the exception that I wanted to see thrown by a piece of code. It's a style that sometimes has its merits. –  David Heffernan May 23 '13 at 20:29
2  
I agree, as long as it's used extremely sparingly - in an NUnit test case, for instance ;-). Having worked on debugging code written by someone who thought this style was the way to do almost everything (and didn't last very long) and try to maintain it later, though, I'll even repeat sparingly a third time. –  Ken White May 23 '13 at 20:35
    
@Ken you make a good point about debugging. No fun to be had debugging a fluent statement with 10 dots!! –  David Heffernan May 23 '13 at 20:54
    
So it means javaScript debuggers have no life? ;-) –  EASI May 23 '13 at 21:06

Can't speak for xe3, but my old Delphi5 could do it this way:

type
  TMyClass = class
  public
    function Foo: Any;
    function Bar: Other;
    function Baz: Tipes;
  end;

var
  obj: TMyClass;

with obj do begin Foo; Bar; Baz; end;

or:

with obj do begin
  Foo;
  Bar;
  Baz;
end;

Not the same, but for more properties/methods quite useful.

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Is it not the same as if you did not return the class? Come on! ;-) –  EASI May 23 '13 at 21:10
1  
First, the OP is probably already aware of the with construct; the question isn't about it. Second, why do you return TMyClass everywhere? This A is only confusing. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 23 '13 at 21:17
1  
@Stijn: But I need with TOpenDialog.Create(nil) do try ...! –  Andreas Rejbrand May 23 '13 at 21:18
1  
I find this answer creative. When you think of it, this does basically the same as what the op asks for, but here you can add breakpoints. +1 for thinking outside of the box. –  Wouter van Nifterick May 23 '13 at 21:32
1  
But your answer is a good example too, of a good ways of programming. –  EASI May 23 '13 at 22:23

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