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I followed an Entity Framework tutorial and wrote an ApplicationConfig model (this is simplified) -

public class ApplicationConfig
{
    public ApplicationConfig()
    {
        this.Users = new Collection<User>();
        this.Roles = new Collection<Role>();
    }

    public string Namespace { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Role> Roles { get; set; }
}


public class User
{
    public User()
    {
        this.Roles = new Collection<Role>();
        this.ApplicationConfigs = new Collection<ApplicationConfig>();
    }

    public int UserId { get; set; }

    public string Username { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Role> Roles { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<ApplicationConfig> ApplicationConfigs { get; set; }
}

I have a method to check a username/password for a particular Application -

public User ValidateUser(string applicationNamespace, string username, string password)
{
    var applicationConfig = GetApplicationConfig(applicationNamespace);

    User user = null;
    if (applicationConfig != null)
    {
       user = applicationConfig.Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.Username.ToLower() == username && u.Password == password);
    }
    return user;
}

I could have hundreds or thousands of users for an application but for this password check I only want the matching user returned.

Is ICollection and the query above ok for this purpose?

My main concern is that the applicationConfig.Users will be filled all the thousands of users even though I want to query just one.

Or should I be using IQueryable or IEnumerable or something else?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Doesn't look good. Your concern is valid and you must use an IQueryable<User> that ultimately goes back to a DbSet<User> (or ObjectSet<User>) of your Entity Framework DbContext (or ObjectContext) in order to ensure that you query the user actually in the database and not in memory after you have loaded thousands of them.

I don't understand your architecture with this ApplicationConfig exactly, but somewhere you must call:

user = context.Users.FirstOrDefault(u =>
     u.Username.ToLower() == username && u.Password == password);

Basically the same LINQ but with context (=instance of your derived DbContext (or ObjectContext)) instead of applicationConfig. This will be translated into the SQL query that filters the user in the database.

Edit

If the ApplicationConfig class is an entity in your model and database with relationships to Users and Roles you can still validate the user based on credentials and applicationNamespace by a single database query without having to load all users for an application. It could look like this for example:

public User ValidateUser(string applicationNamespace,
    string username, string password)
{
    return context.ApplicationConfigs
        .Where(a => a.Namespace == applicationNamespace)
        .Select(a => a.Users
            .Where(u => u.Username.ToLower() == username &&
                u.Password == password)
            .FirstOrDefault())
        .FirstOrDefault();
}

Or - if you'd give the User entity an ApplicationConfigs collection (based on your comment below I'm assuming that one user account can participate in many applications -> many-to-many relationship) - you could write the query like so:

public User ValidateUser(string applicationNamespace,
    string username, string password)
{
    return context.Users
        .FirstOrDefault(u =>
            u.ApplicationConfigs.Any(a => a.Namespace == applicationNamespace) &&
            u.Username.ToLower() == username && u.Password == password);
}

I would prefer the latter version because you can easily include the user's roles if you need them by adding Include(u => u.Roles) after context.Users.

In any case the key is to have a context available to perform the complete validation in one step. Don't cut this into two pieces like loading the ApplicationConfig first with all users and then filering the user from the loaded Users collection.

share|improve this answer
    
I identify an application by its Namespace. Applications have many Users. I called the class ApplicationConfig to avoid confusion with the c# Application class. –  tom May 23 '13 at 22:03
    
To validate a User I have to first get that User for that Application with the Username entered. I think my model of a User has to have some sort of Collection of ApplicationConfigs to achieve this. Is this correct? –  tom May 23 '13 at 22:06
    
@tom: I've appended an Edit section to my answer, I hope it makes it clearer. –  Slauma May 23 '13 at 23:06
    
I added in my User class. Which shows the many to many relationship with ApplicationConfig –  tom May 24 '13 at 17:43
    
BUT, when I use your last query, the resulting User object has a Collection of ApplicationConfigs, and these ApplicationConfigs have fully loaded all the users for that application. –  tom May 24 '13 at 17:44

Looks good. you can simplify the return:

public User ValidateUser(string applicationNamespace, string username, string password)
{
   var applicationConfig = GetApplicationConfig(applicationNamespace);

   if (applicationConfig != null)
   {
       return applicationConfig.Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.Username.ToLower() == username && u.Password == password);
   }
   return null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
And what does this return if applicationConfig is null? –  Esoteric Screen Name May 23 '13 at 19:56
    
FirstOrDefault() will return the entity you're looking for or null. Another useful function is Single(), which will either return the entity or throw an exception if it's not found or if there is more than one, which is useful if you know there should be one and only one matching entity. –  Steve May 23 '13 at 19:58

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