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As Java 6 does not have switch-case for String, I often change an if-else block to switch-case using enum as in the code below. However, when I tried to check the performance of the two alternatives, I found that switch-case to be slower than the if-else alternative, contrary to what I had expected. Here are some of the results that I got for the code below

Iterations  If-Else   Switch-Case
1           11810      1609181
10           8214      1059115
100         24141      1152494
1000           183975      1580605
10000         4452698      8710648
100000        7069243     19457585

package conditionals;

import java.util.Random;


public class StringConditionalCheck {

    private static int ifElseCounter = 0;
    private static int switchCaseCounter = 0;

    private static final String first = "First";
    private static final String second = "Second";
    private static final String third = "Third";
    private static final String fourth = "Fourth";

    enum StringOptions {
        First, Second, Third, Fourth
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final int iterations = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        String[] userInputs = generateUserInputs(iterations);

        // Using if-else
        long ifelseStartTime = System.nanoTime();       
        for(int i=0; i<iterations; i++){
            useIfElse(userInputs[i]);
        }       
        long ifelseEndTime = System.nanoTime();
        long ifElseDuration = ifelseEndTime - ifelseStartTime;


        long switchcaseStartTime = System.nanoTime();
        for(int i=0; i<iterations; i++){
            useSwitchCase(userInputs[i]);
        }
        long switchcaseEndTime = System.nanoTime();     
        //just to verify that both options had the same result.
        long switchcaseDuration = switchcaseEndTime - switchcaseStartTime;
        System.out.println(iterations + " " + ifElseDuration + " " + switchcaseDuration + " " + ifElseCounter + " " + switchCaseCounter);
    }

    private static String[] generateUserInputs(int numberOfInputs) {
        String[] generatedInputs = new String[numberOfInputs];
        String[] inputsToChooseFrom = new String[]{first, second, third, fourth};
        Random r = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfInputs; i++) {
            int choice = r.nextInt(4);
            generatedInputs[i] = inputsToChooseFrom[choice];
        }
        return generatedInputs;
    }

    public static void useSwitchCase(String input) {
        StringOptions option = StringOptions.valueOf(input);
        switch(option){

        case First:
            switchCaseCounter += 1;
            break;

        case Second:
            switchCaseCounter += 2;
            break;

        case Third:
            switchCaseCounter += 3;
            break;

        case Fourth:
            switchCaseCounter += 4;
            break;          
        }
    }

    public static void useIfElse(String input) {
        if(input.equals("First")){
            ifElseCounter += 1; 
        }else if(input.equals("Second")){
            ifElseCounter += 2;
        }else if(input.equals("Third")){
            ifElseCounter += 3;
        }else if(input.equals("Fourth")){
            ifElseCounter += 4;
        }
    }
}

What is the cause for this difference? I was expecting that if-else would be slower as there will be more comparisons on average.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because 99% of your time is being spent in StringOptions option = StringOptions.valueOf(input);, not in the switch

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oops! completely missed that :P –  Ankit May 23 '13 at 20:26

Based on the source code, the StringOptions.valueOf call does several complicated things, including building a HashMap every call, whereas String.equals simply loops through the string once.

Compare the source code for Enum.valueOf (which calls Enum.getConstantDirectory) to String.equals.

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just a minor correction. It does not build a HashMap on every call, only the first call. But yes, I see it does several operations before returning the result. –  Ankit May 23 '13 at 20:38

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