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I'm trying to setup a Timestamp/Rowversion on a Parent table so that when the Child table updates, the Timestamp on the Parent table row changes.

I don't need to know about the row in the Child table, just that according to the parent this particular row has changed.

USE [Test]
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Clerk](
  [ID] [int] NOT NULL,
  [Name] [varchar](20) NOT NULL,
  [lastUpdate] [timestamp] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Clerk] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
  [ID] ASC
)
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ClerkAddress](
  [ClerkID] [int] NOT NULL,
  [Address] [varchar](40) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_ClerkAddress] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
  [ClerkID] ASC
)
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[ClerkAddress]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_ClerkAddress_Clerk] FOREIGN KEY([ClerkID])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Clerk] ([ID])
ON UPDATE CASCADE


insert into Clerk (ID, Name) values (1, 'Test1')
insert into Clerk (id, Name) values (2, 'Test2')

insert into ClerkAddress (ClerkID, Address) values (1, 'address1')
insert into ClerkAddress (ClerkID, Address) values (2, 'address2')

using the following code examples.

update ClerkAddress set Address = NEWID() where ClerkID = 2
--no change to Clerk when address changes 
select * from Clerk 
select * from ClerkAddress 

--Of course these update the lastUpdate in clerk
update Clerk set Name = 'test2' where ID = 2 
update Clerk set Name = name

Is this even possible or do I need to make triggers for the updates? (update clerk set name = name where id = ClerkID)

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The TIMESTAMP type in SQL Server is always automatically updated by SQL Server itself - you cannot update it yourself. So I don't see how you could update the parent's TIMESTAMP when the child row changes; a TIMESTAMP in the child row would be updated, though ... –  marc_s May 24 '13 at 5:00
    
i understand that I was hoping there might be a way without needing to use triggers. If triggers are the way then that's what i'll have to do. (update Clerk set Name = Name where Clerk.ID in (select clerkid from inserted) –  Paul Farry May 24 '13 at 5:29
2  
I believe triggers are your only viable option, yes. –  marc_s May 24 '13 at 5:33
    
I agree with marc - you'll need triggers –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 24 '13 at 6:55
1  
Why do you want to update a timestamp in the parent? I can understand it it was a datetime value –  gbn May 24 '13 at 7:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can make it appear as though the parent row is updated with a view.
You need to add a rowversion column to ClerkAddress, then

CREATE VIEW dbo.Clerk2
WITH SCHEMABINDING -- works for me on SQL Server 2012
AS
SELECT
    C.ID, C.Name, ISNULL(MAX(CA.lastUpdate), C.lastUpdate) AS lastupdate
FROM
    [dbo].[Clerk] C
    LEFT JOIN
    [dbo].[ClerkAddress] CA ON C.ID = CA.ClerkID
GROUP BY
    C.ID, C.Name, C.lastUpdate
GO
SELECT * FROM dbo.Clerk2;
GO
update ClerkAddress set Address = NEWID() where ClerkID = 2;
GO
SELECT * FROM dbo.Clerk2;
GO
update ClerkAddress set Address = NEWID() where ClerkID = 2;
GO
SELECT * FROM dbo.Clerk2;
GO

This uses the highest value from rowversion yet preserves the actual rowversion on Clerk (which can still be used for optimistic concurrency by the client)

This works because rowversion is database unique

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