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I have a method which does 2 independent pieces of logic. I was hoping I can run them both at the same time .. and only continue afterwards when both those child methods have completed.

I was trying to get my head around the async/await syntax but I just don't get it.

Here's the code:

public PewPew SomeMethod(Foo foo)
{
    var cats = GetAllTheCats(foo);
    var food = GetAllTheFood(foo);

    return new PewPew
               {
                   Cats = cats,
                   Food = food
               };
}

private IList<Cat> GetAllTheCats(Foo foo)
{
    // Do stuff, like hit the Db, spin around, dance, jump, etc...
    // It all takes some time.
    return cats;
}

private IList<Food> GetAllTheFood(Foo foo)
{
    // Do more stuff, like hit the Db, nom nom noms...
    // It all takes some time.
    return food;
}

So with that code above, I want to say : go and get all the cats and food at the same time. Once we're finished, then return a new PewPew.

I'm confused because I'm not sure which classes above are async or return a Task, etc. All of em? just the two private ones? I'm also guessing I need to leverage the Task.WaitAll(tasks) method, but I'm unsure how to setup the tasks to run at the same time.

Suggestions, kind folks?

share|improve this question
4  
Foo foo will be shared between threads. Make sure you lock correctly. –  Corak May 24 '13 at 6:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here is what you may want to do:

public async Task<PewPew> SomeMethod(Foo foo)
{
    // get the stuff on another thread 
    var cTask = Task.Run(() => GetAllTheCats(foo));
    var fTask = Task.Run(() => GetAllTheFood(foo));

    var cats = await cTask;
    var food = await fTask;

    return new PewPew
               {
                   Cats = cats,
                   Food = food
               };
}

public IList<Cat> GetAllTheCats(Foo foo)
{
    // Do stuff, like hit the Db, spin around, dance, jump, etc...
    // It all takes some time.
    return cats;
}

public IList<Food> GetAllTheFood(Foo foo)
{
    // Do more stuff, like hit the Db, nom nom noms...
    // It all takes some time.
    return food;
}

There are two things you need to understand here:

1) What is diff between this:

var cats = await cTask;
var food = await fTask;

And this:

Task.WaitAll(new [] {cTask, fTask});

Both will give you similar result in the sense let the 2 async tasks finish and then return new PewPew - however, differnce is that Task.WaitAll() will block the current thread (if that is UI thread, then UI will freeze). instead, await will break down the SomeMethod say in a state machine, and return from the SomeMethod to its caller as it encounters await keyword. It will not block the thread. The Code below await will be scheduled to run when async task is over.

2) You could also do this:

var cats = await Task.Run(() => GetAllTheCats(foo));
var food = await Task.Run(() => GetAllTheFood(foo));

However, this will not start the async tasks simultaneously. Second task will start after the first is over. This is because how the await keyword works. HTH.

EDIT: How to use SomeMethod - somewhere at the start of the call tree, you have to use Wait() or Result property - OR - you have to await from async void. Generally, async void would be an event handler:

public async void OnSomeEvent(object sender, EventArgs ez) 
{ 
  Foo f = GetFoo();
  PewPew p = await SomeMethod(f);
}

If not then use result property.

public Foo2 NonAsyncNonVoidMethod() 
{
   Foo f = GetFoo();
   PewPew p = SomeMethod(f).Result; //But be aware that Result will block thread

   return GetFoo2(p);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
await cTask and await fTask wouldn't that wait for the first then the second ? I mean is it going to be parallel ? –  Dimitar Dimitrov May 24 '13 at 6:17
1  
yes, wait will be sequential, however, tasks have been started in parallel. its not different than task.WaitAll() in terms of time taken to wait. –  YK1 May 24 '13 at 6:22
1  
@YK1 soz buddy - i'm confused. Are you saying that even though you do var cats = await cTask; and var food = await fTask .. both those tasks will run at the same time (async) and not one -at a time- (sync). –  Pure.Krome May 24 '13 at 6:24
1  
@Pure.Krome yes, tasks will start running when you say Task.Run() and not when you say await. –  YK1 May 24 '13 at 6:25
1  
@YK1 i also get a compile error :( The return type of an async method myst be void, Task or Task<T> .. and this is for the method SomeMethod.. –  Pure.Krome May 24 '13 at 6:36

You don't have to use async if you're not in an async method or you're using an older version of the .Net framework.. just use Tasks for simplicity:

Task taskA = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => GetAllTheCats(foo));
Task taskB = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => GetAllTheFood(foo));

Task.WaitAll(new [] { taskA, taskB });
// Will continue after both tasks completed
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 the confusion seemed to be using Tasks with Async. –  Jeremy Thompson May 24 '13 at 6:09
    
@AdamTal - when to use Tasks and when Async? Does both run methods simultaneously? –  xameeramir Jun 15 at 11:02
1  
@zameeramir - async is a compiler implementation of tasks running. Use async when you can but when you're not in an async context you can simply use a Task for running something in a different thread. –  Adam Tal Jun 15 at 15:33

You can use the TPL to wait for multiple tasks while they are running. See here.

Like this:

public PewPew SomeMethod(Foo foo) {
    IList<Cat> cats = null;
    IList<Food> foods = null;

    Task[] tasks = new tasks[2] {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { cats = GetAllTheCats(foo); }),
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { food = GetAllTheFood(foo); })
    };

    Task.WaitAll(tasks);

    return new PewPew
               {
                   Cats = cats,
                   Food = food
               };
}
share|improve this answer

Adding to the other answers, you could do something like:

public PewPew SomeMethod(Foo foo)
{
    Task<IList<Cat>> catsTask = GetAllTheCatsAsync(foo);
    Task<IList<Food>> foodTask = GetAllTheFoodAsync(foo);

    // wait for both tasks to complete
    Task.WaitAll(catsTask, foodTask);

    return new PewPew
    {
        Cats = catsTask.Result,
        Food = foodTask.Result
    };
}

public async Task<IList<Cat>> GetAllTheCatsAsync(Foo foo)
{
    await Task.Delay(7000); // wait for a while
    return new List<Cat>();
}

public async Task<IList<Food>> GetAllTheFoodAsync(Foo foo)
{
    await Task.Delay(5000); // wait for a while
    return new List<Food>();
}
share|improve this answer

By far the easiest way to do this is to use Parallel.Invoke()

IList<Cat> cats;
IList<Food> food;

Parallel.Invoke
(
    () => cats = GetAllTheCats(foo),
    () => food = GetAllTheFood(foo)
);

Parallel.Invoke() will wait for all the methods to return before it itself returns.

More information here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460705.aspx

Note that Parallel.Invoke() handles scaling to the number of processors in your system, but that only really matters if you're starting more than just a couple of tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, that's pretty sweet. +1 –  Dimitar Dimitrov May 24 '13 at 6:20
    
like Task.WaitAll(), Parallel.Invoke() will block calling thread. This is unlike await. –  YK1 May 24 '13 at 6:50
    
@YK1 Indeed but the op asked "I was hoping I can run them both at the same time .. and only continue afterwards when both those child methods have completed." which this does, of course. –  Matthew Watson May 24 '13 at 7:33
    
@MatthewWatson: yes, but he also said, head around the async/await syntax - so i've compared between non-blocking await and blocking Wait() –  YK1 May 24 '13 at 7:47
1  
@YK1 Yep, the first part of your answer does work (I +1ed it) Seems I was trying an incorrect version at first. –  Matthew Watson May 24 '13 at 9:13

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