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Whenever an error occurs inside an event handler, it stops code execution entirely so the second event callback isn't called.

For example:

$(function() {
    window.thisDoesntExist();
}
$(function() {
    //Do something unharmful and unrelated to the first event
}

You can easily solve the problem in this (simplified) example by adding try/catch in both anonymous functions, but in reality these functions often add several other event handlers which in turn would require try/catch. I end up with very repetitive code stuffed with try/catch blocks.

My projects has a modular design where each feature is in a different JS (and gets concatenated during a build process). I'm looking for a more generic way to handle errors inside each feature so that the error doesn't stop code execution of the other features.

I already tried following solutions: - window.onerror (even if you return true in this function, code execution is stopped) - $(window).error() => deprecated and code execution stops

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Did you read my question ? You can easily solve the problem in this (simplified) example by adding try/catch in both anonymous functions, but in reality these functions often add several other event handlers which in turn would require try/catch. I end up with very repetitive code stuffed with try/catch blocks. –  Webberig May 24 '13 at 7:29
    
Well maybe that's the compromise you have to make if you want your code to be as robust as possible. –  CBroe May 24 '13 at 7:49
    
@Webberig, sure I do. The basic requirement you need is to continue running code on (any) error. The only way is to use try catch. It is the first step. After, you can either use an error callback or emit an error event or whatever to make your error handling solid and flexible. You can refer Requirejs's source code, it uses try catch as well. github.com/jrburke/requirejs/blob/master/require.js –  Chris Li May 24 '13 at 8:54

4 Answers 4

You could create a helper function to prevent duplication of the same boilerplate code.

function tryFunction(f, onerror) {
    try {
        if (typeof f == 'function') {
            return f();
        }
    } catch (e) {
        return onerror(e);
    }
}

$(function() {
    var result = tryFunction(window.thisDoesNotExist, function (error) {
        alert('Whoops: ' + error);
    });
});

I created a little demonstration. It's slightly different but the same idea.

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You can simply call if (typeof myFunction == 'function') before calling myFunction()

And optionally wrap it in a generic function like said by Bart to have the choice to log an error in the console if your function does not exists.

If your webapp is huge with many interaction and JS, too many try catch could alter the global performance of your application.

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I would try something like this with a wrapper which will handle the try catch for you (see below, or this jsfiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/TVfCj/2/)

From the way I'm (not, and not really) handling the this and the arguments, I guess it's obvious I'm beginning with js. But I hope you get the idea, and it is correct/useful.

  var wrapper = {
      wrap: function wrap(f) {
          return function (args) {
              try {
                  f.apply(null, args);
              } catch (ex){
                  console.log(f.name+" crashed with args "+args);
              };
          };
      }
  };

  var f1 = function f1Crashes(arg) {
      return window.thisDoesntExist();
  };
  var f2 = function f2Crashes(arg) {
      return window.thisDoesntExist();
  };

  var f3 = function f3MustNotCrash(arg) {
      wrapper.wrap(f1)(arg);
      wrapper.wrap(f2)(arg);
  }

  f3('myarg');
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a solution. When using setTimeout, the code is executed in a seperate thread, therefor it won't break any other parts of the webpage.

$(function() {
    setTimeout(function() {
    window.thisDoesntExist();
    }, 0);
});
$(function() {
    setTimeout(function() {
        //Do something unharmful and unrelated to the first event
        alert("This passes")
    }, 0);
});

In this example, the second function is run, even when the first one throws an error. Here's a working example: http://jsfiddle.net/mathieumaes/uaEsy/

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1  
+1 because I learned something -1 because this is a super gross hack –  mpd Mar 13 at 23:31

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