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I am having the following java code, in which I am trying to copy the ArrayList to another ArrayList.

 ArrayList<String> nodes = new ArrayList<String>();
 ArrayList NodeList=new ArrayList();
 ArrayList list=new ArrayList();

        for(int i=0;i<PropertyNode.getLength()-1;i++){
            Node childNode =  PropertyNode.item(i);
                NodeList Children = childNode.getChildNodes();

                if(Children!=null){
                    nodes.clear();
                    nodes.add("PropertyStart");
                    nodes.add(Children.item(3).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(7).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(9).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(11).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(13).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add("PropertyEnd");

                }   
                NodeList.addAll(nodes);
                list.add(NodeList);
        }

I want the "list" array to be in this format:

[[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd],[PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd],[PropertyStart,......]]

But from the above code, the "list" array output is seen like this:

[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,....PropertyEnd]

I think you might have noticed the difference. I am not able to achieve the result in expected format. Please suggest me any solution!! Thanks in advance!!

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4  
Don't use raw lists. Use the generic types, and you'll see the problem... –  jlordo May 24 '13 at 8:06
4  
Please start your variable names with a lowercase letter. –  Keppil May 24 '13 at 8:07
1  
@Keppil, Thanks for your suggestion. I will correct myself here onwards. –  Mahe May 24 '13 at 8:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Then you need a ArrayList of ArrayLists:

ArrayList<ArrayList<String>> nodes = new ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>();
ArrayList<String> nodeList = new ArrayList<String>();
nodes.add(nodeList);

Note that NodeList has been changed to nodeList. In Java Naming Conventions variables start with a lower case. Classes start with an upper case.

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Your Problem

Mainly, you've got 2 major problems:

You are using adding a List of Strings. You want a List containing Lists of Strings.

Note as well that when you invoke this:

NodeList.addAll(nodes);

... all you say is to add all elements of nodes (which is a list of Strings) to the (badly named) NodeList, which is using Objects and thus adds only the strings inside. Which leads me to the next point.

You seem to be confused between your nodes and NodeList. Your NodeList keeps growing over time, and that's what you add to your list.

So, even if doing things right, if we were to look at the end of each iteration at your nodes, nodeList and list, we'd see:

  • i = 0

    nodes: [PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd]
    nodeList: [PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd]
    list: [[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd]]
    
  • i = 1

    nodes: [PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd]
    nodeList: [PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd, PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd]
    list: [[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd],[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd, PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd]]
    
  • i = 2

    nodes: [PropertyStart,g,h,i,PropertyEnd]
    nodeList: [PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,g,h,i,PropertyEnd]
    list: [[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd],[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd, PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd],[PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,g,h,i,PropertyEnd]]
    
  • and so on...

Some Other Corrections

Follow the Java Naming Conventions

Don't use variable names starting with uppercase letters. So here, replace NodeList with nodeList).

Learn a Bit More About Types

You say "I want the "list" array [...]". This is confusing for whoever you will be communicating with: It's not an array. It's an implementation of List backed by an array.

There's a difference between a type, an interface, and an implementation.

Use Generics for Stronger Typing in Collections

Use generic types, because static typing really helps with these errors. Also, use interfaces where possible, except if you have a good reason to use the concrete type.

So your code becomes:

List<String> nodes = new ArrayList<String>();
List<String> nodeList = new ArrayList<String>();
List<List<String>> list = new ArrayList<List<String>>();

Remove Unnecessary Code

You could do away with the nodeList entirely, and write the following once you've fixed your types:

list.add(nodes);

Use the Right Scope

Except if you have a very strong reason to do so, prefer to use the inner-most scope to declare variables and limit both their lifespan for their references and facilitate the separation of concerns in your code.

Here you could then move List<String> nodes to be declared within the loop (and then forget the nodes.clear() invocation).

A reason not to do this could be performance, as you might want to avoid recreating an ArrayList on each iteration of the loop, but it's very unlikely that's a concern to you (and clean, readable and maintainable code has priority over pre-optimized code).

SSCCE

Last but not least, if you want help give us the exact reproducible case with a short, self-Contained, correct example.

Here you give us your program's outputs, but don't mention how you got them, so we're left to assume you did a System.out.println(list). And you confused a lot of people, as I think the output you give us is not what you actually got.

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Wouldn't it just be a case of:

ArrayList<ArrayList<String>> outer = new ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>();
ArrayList<String> nodeList = new ArrayList<String>();

// Fill in nodeList here...

outer.add(nodeList);

Repeat as necesary.

This should return you a list in the format you specified.

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The problem you have is caused that you use the same ArrayList NodeList over all iterations in main for loop. Each iterations NodeList is enlarged by new elements.

  1. After first loop, NodeList has 5 elements (PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd) and list has 1 element (NodeList: (PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd))

  2. After second loop NodeList has 10 elements (PropertyStart,a,b,c,PropertyEnd,PropertyStart,d,e,f,PropertyEnd) and list has 2 elements (NodeList (with 10 elements), NodeList (with 10 elements))

To get you expectations you must replace

NodeList.addAll(nodes);
list.add(NodeList)

by

List childrenList = new ArrayList(nodes);
list.add(childrenList);

PS. Your code is not readable, keep Java code conventions to have readble code. For example is hard to recognize if NodeList is a class or object

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Initiate the NodeList inside the for loop and you will get the desired output.

ArrayList<String> nodes = new ArrayList<String>();
 ArrayList list=new ArrayList();

        for(int i=0;i<PropertyNode.getLength()-1;i++){
            ArrayList NodeList=new ArrayList();
            Node childNode =  PropertyNode.item(i);
                NodeList Children = childNode.getChildNodes();

                if(Children!=null){
                    nodes.clear();
                    nodes.add("PropertyStart");
                    nodes.add(Children.item(3).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(7).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(9).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(11).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add(Children.item(13).getTextContent());
                    nodes.add("PropertyEnd");

                }   
                NodeList.addAll(nodes);
                list.add(NodeList);
        }

Explanation: NodeList is an object which remains same throughout the loop so adding same variable to list in a loop will actually add it only once. The loop is only adding its variables in single NodeList array hence you must be seeing

[/*list*/    [  /*NodeList*/   ]   ]

and NodeList contains [prostart, a,b,c,proend,prostart,d,e,f,proend ...]

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Very first will declare outer Arraylist which will contain another inner Arraylist inside it

ArrayList> CompletesystemStatusArrayList; ArrayList systemStatusArrayList

CompletesystemStatusArrayList=new ArrayList

systemStatusArrayList=new ArrayList();

    systemStatusArrayList.add("1");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("2");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("3");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("4");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("5");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("6");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("7");
    systemStatusArrayList.add("8");

    CompletesystemStatusArrayList.add(systemStatusArrayList);
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I got a best answer from this website http://www.tutorialhall.com/2015/03/how-to-add-arraylist-into-another-arraylist-java-code.html

    ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>> nodes = new ArrayList<ArrayList<Integer>>();
    ArrayList<Integer> nodeList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    ArrayList<Integer> nodeList2 = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    ArrayList<Integer> getResults = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    //add data
    nodeList.add(200);
    nodeList.add(300);
    nodeList2.add(201);
    nodeList2.add(301);
    //add arraylist into main arraylist
    nodes.add(nodeList);
    nodes.add(nodeList2);

    getResults = nodes.get(0); //get arraylist from main arraylist
    System.out.println(getResults.get(0));
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