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The code is very straight-forward as follows:

var populateGoogleMap = function (points) {
    for (i = points.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
            map: map,
            draggable: true,
            animation: google.maps.Animation.DROP,
            position: new google.maps.LatLng(point.target.x, point.target.y)
        });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function (e) {
            toggleBounce(marker);
        });
        nodes[i].marker = marker;
    }
};

It turns out that the marker in toggleBounce(marker) is ALWAYS the last marker that gets created. I considered this problem for a bit, and found a solution by modifying the function. I removed the loop in the function, and use a loop elsewhere to call this function multiple times. So basically now it becomes for (i = 0; i < points.length; i++) { populateGoogleMap(point); }.

Is this behavior intended by Google Maps API? I think this can be confusing to many people, since the variable should refer to the one in the current context.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This isn't something unique to Google Maps. You've creating an event listener function X times:

google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function (e) {
    toggleBounce(marker);
});

When you've finished your loop, the value of marker is the very last one created in the loop. All you've really done is re-define the marker click event listener, X times.

Another way to explain it. Imagine you didn't have a loop, but you were creating multiple markers, like this:

        var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
            map: map,
            draggable: true,
            animation: google.maps.Animation.DROP,
            position: new google.maps.LatLng(point.target.x, point.target.y)
        });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function (e) {
            toggleBounce(marker);
        });

        var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
            map: map,
            draggable: true,
            animation: google.maps.Animation.DROP,
            position: new google.maps.LatLng(point.target.x, point.target.y)
        });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function (e) {
            toggleBounce(marker);
        });

You've managed to create two markers (even though they have the same variable name), but all you've done is create one event listener function, and it'll only work for the 2nd of those two markers.

If instead you'd done:

        var marker1 = new google.maps.Marker({
            map: map,
            draggable: true,
            animation: google.maps.Animation.DROP,
            position: new google.maps.LatLng(point.target.x, point.target.y)
        });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker1, 'click', function (e) {
            toggleBounce(marker1);
        });

        var marker2 = new google.maps.Marker({
            map: map,
            draggable: true,
            animation: google.maps.Animation.DROP,
            position: new google.maps.LatLng(point.target.x, point.target.y)
        });
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker2, 'click', function (e) {
            toggleBounce(marker2);
        });

then you've got two different event listener functions, for the two different markers. So by moving this into its own function outwith the loop, and passing each marker into that function as an argument, you're creating a unique event listener for each one. Make sense?

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this makes a lot of sense, but how do I solve this if I want to keep the loop? –  Michiel Nov 14 '13 at 10:13
1  
You can keep your loop for adding markers, but you need to move the event listener outside of that loop (into another wrapper function). You then call that wrapper function from inside of your loop. –  duncan Nov 14 '13 at 10:16
    
thanks Duncan, that was the trick! +1 –  Michiel Nov 14 '13 at 10:27

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