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I want my application to go and find a .CSV excel file and convert it into a .xlsx file instead.

Here's what I'm currently doing;

    var fileName = @"Z:\0328\orders\PurchaseOrder.csv";
    FileInfo f = new FileInfo(fileName);
    f.MoveTo(Path.ChangeExtension(fileName, ".xlsx"));
    var Newfile = @"Z:\0328\orders\PurchaseOrder.xlsx";

Now this does work, it changes the file extension to my desired format, however, the file then becomes 'corrupt' or at least Excel refuses to open it and neither will my application when I try to venture further.

Does anyone have a solution/work-around?

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you cannot do it by directly changing the file extension. Try to use any third party dll. –  saravanan May 24 '13 at 10:01
    
Could I open the file and save it as a new format? Possible? –  William May 24 '13 at 10:03
    
Yes, open it and save to the new format will work. Should be possible to get an Excel VBA macro to do it, if that helps –  Stochastically May 24 '13 at 10:04
    
You need to use something like the Open XML SDK from Microsoft to do that. However, unless you plan to add some additional features (embed formulas, fonts, colors, diagrams, etc.) you can simply stick with the CSV file, as Excel will open that happily. –  Christian.K May 24 '13 at 10:06
    
You could use EPPlus or NPOI which allow you to write native XLSX files. –  CSL May 24 '13 at 10:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would parse in the CSV file and use this to write out an Excel file : http://epplus.codeplex.com/

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Second that - EPPlus is a great tool –  CSL May 24 '13 at 10:07

For those who want to use Interop instead of an external library, you can simply do this:

Application app = new Application();
Workbook wb = app.Workbooks.Open(@"C:\testcsv.csv", Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing);
wb.SaveAs(@"C:\testcsv.xlsx", XlFileFormat.xlOpenXMLWorkbook, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, XlSaveAsAccessMode.xlExclusive, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing);
wb.Close();
app.Quit();

The second argument of Workbook.SaveAs determines the true format of the file. You should make the filename extension match that format so Excel doesn't complain about corruption. You can see a list of the types and what they mean on MSDN.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.office.interop.excel.xlfileformat.aspx

As always, please keep Microsoft's considerations in mind if this functionality is intended for a server environment. Interop may not be the way to go in that situation:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/257757

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Just tested it - works perfectly well with Office 2013, thanks! Also wanted to add that in .net 4 you can skip all those nasty Type.Missing. You can simply call: Workbook wb = app.Workbooks.Open(csvPath); wb.SaveAs(xlsxPath, XlFileFormat.xlOpenXMLWorkbook, AccessMode: XlSaveAsAccessMode.xlExclusive); –  kDar Feb 9 at 19:09
    
@kDar - your code saves the file in Password protected mode. –  SKG Jul 29 at 22:27

I would recommend using the following technique:

  1. http://kbcsv.codeplex.com/ this reads CSV files in very easily and is very robust.
  2. Create a datatable from the csv via the kbcsv extensions.
  3. Use the eppplus library and its LoadFromDataTable to create a valid xlsx file (http://epplus.codeplex.com/)
  4. done!

Advantages:

  • It is faster than excel interop
  • KBCSV is more robust than excels csv reading methods.
  • It is availabe in environments witohout office.
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Cant put this as a comment because of limited privilieges. But you can check this SO post.

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I would recommend Closed XML which is a wrapper around Open XML SDK. Check out their examples. It's pretty easy to create a .xlsx file.

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