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i am currently implementing a binary tree in c++ and i want to traverse it with a function called in_order().

is there any way to pass a function as an argument, so that i can do things like below (without having to write the code to traverse the list more than once)?

struct tree_node; // and so on
class  tree;      // and so on

void print_node () {
  // some stuff here
}

// some other functions

tree mytree();

// insert some nodes

mytree.in_order(print_node);
mytree.in_order(push_node_to_stack);
mytree.in_order(something_else);
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this in a number of ways. Here are two common possibilities.

Old-style function pointers

class mytree
{
    // typedef for a function pointer to act
    typedef void (*node_fn_ptr)(tree_node&);

    void in_order(node_fn_ptr)
    {
        tree_node* pNode;

        while (/* ... */)
        {
        // traverse...
        // ... lots of code

        // found node!
            (*fnptr)(*pNode);
            // equivalently: fnptr(*pNode)
        }
    }
};

void MyFunc(tree_node& tn)
{
    // ...
}

void sample(mytree& tree)
{
    // called with a default constructed function:
    tree.inorder(&MyFunc);
    // equivalently: tree.inorder(MyFunc);
}

Using functors

With a template member, works with function pointers

class mytree
{
    // typedef for a function pointer to act
    typedef void (*node_fn_ptr)(tree_node&);

    template<class F>
    void in_order(F f)
    {
        tree_node* pNode;

        while (/* ... */)
        {
        // traverse...
        // ... lots of code

        // found node!
            f(*pNode);
        }
    }
};

struct ExampleFunctor
{
    void operator()(tree_node& node)
    {
        // do something with node
    }
}

void sample(mytree& tree)
{
    // called with a default constructed function:
    tree.inorder(ExampleFunctor());
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 You beat me by 30s ;) – AraK Nov 4 '09 at 12:03
1  
@AraK: I was typing as fast as I could... – Charles Bailey Nov 4 '09 at 12:07
    
thanks, really helped me a lot! – Patrick Oscity Nov 4 '09 at 12:19
    
+1: hoping the OP will use the new style rather the C-style :) – Matthieu M. Nov 4 '09 at 12:46
    
+1 - It may be worth adding a note explaining the pros and cons of these two methods though. (functors can store state, and are easier inlined by the compiler) – jalf Nov 4 '09 at 16:19

Yes, you can use a function pointer as a parameter to in_order. You may also need to overload it, in case the passed functions' signatures don't match. For functions like print_node, declare in_order like this (provided its return type is void as well):

void tree::in_order( void (*)() )
{
   //implementation
}
share|improve this answer

I think you should use the visitor pattern instead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visitor%5Fpattern

The base visitor class should have a virtual method to operate on a node. Pass the visitor as an argument to your in_order method. Then derive your visitor as many times as you want for any operation you want to do.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually the visitor pattern is probably more powerful than what you actually want to achieve. The strategy pattern should suffice. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern – Julio Nov 4 '09 at 13:16
    
it's both not quite what i was looking for. i think that both would be too bloated for a small binary tree class. interesting concepts, though! – Patrick Oscity Nov 5 '09 at 2:22
    
Yeah a little bit more bloated, but probably more powerful. And when I work in C++ I try to avoid at all cost static functions. – Julio Nov 5 '09 at 13:57

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