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I'm using the R software for statistical analysis and am sad that it doesn't preserve and restore my prompt command history. Indeed, pressing the up arrow on a newly started interactive R session will reveal a blank history, every time. It would be great if it could do this in manner, say, similar to ipython. I tried putting this in my .Rprofile file to no avail. No file containing my command history is ever created.

.First <- function(){
        if (!any(commandArgs()=='--no-readline') && interactive()){
                require(utils)
                try(loadhistory(Sys.getenv("R_HISTFILE")))
        }
}

.Last <- function() {
        if (!any(commandArgs()=='--no-readline') && interactive()){
                require(utils)
                try(savehistory(Sys.getenv("R_HISTFILE")))
        }
}

Of course this line is present in my .bash_profile

export R_HISTFILE="$HOME/share/r_libs/.history"

All this is happening via SSH on a remote server running Linux. Any help greatly appreciated !

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2  
Not really an answer, but most people I think recommend saving the commands you want to use again in a script. Then you don't have to wade through your entire history to find the few commands you want. –  Aaron May 24 '13 at 12:44
    
Yeah of course I'll write my final pipeline in a script; but imagine using something like the bash shell without history preservation across sessions, wouldn't you get frustrated too ? –  xApple May 24 '13 at 12:55
    
Not really, no. I type commands I want to keep in my script, and one-offs in the console. Actually, I get frustrated when I forget to put something I want later in my script and have to wade through my history to find it. –  Aaron May 24 '13 at 13:02
1  
You don't mention what UI you're using - maybe try RStudio or similar? –  hadley May 24 '13 at 13:39
    
@hadley I'm just launching the R prompt from the bash shell after connecting to a node on the cluster with SSH. –  xApple May 24 '13 at 14:34

4 Answers 4

In my ~/.profile I have:

export R_HISTFILE=~/.Rhistory

In my ~/.Rprofile I have:

if (interactive()) {
  .Last <- function() try(savehistory("~/.Rhistory"))
}

and that works for me (although it doesn't work very well if you have multiple R sessions open)

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That doesn't work for me. It will load what ever is in ~/.Rhistory but will not save at the end of each session unless I answer yes to the save workspace image question. –  xApple Jun 12 '13 at 12:19
    
@xApple I also have alias R='R --no-save --no-restore-data --quiet' in my profile which eliminates the questions on close. –  hadley Jun 12 '13 at 13:33

If you work with Rgui : savehistory(), loadhistory() and history() could do the job. Otherwise I guess it depends on the IDE..

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1  
He wants his command history, not his environment. –  Carl Witthoft May 24 '13 at 14:28
    
I'm not interested in saving my session at the moment. I just wanted my history to be preserved. I'm not using any IDE yet. –  xApple May 24 '13 at 14:33
    
First answer was off topic, i'm so tired –  odessa May 24 '13 at 14:34
    
Yes, I have identified the savehistory() and loadhistory() commands. I'm asking how to have this happen automatically at each new session creation. –  xApple May 24 '13 at 14:37

I would recommend you check out the Rstudio IDE here. It has your history stored in a tab if you ever wish to view it, and when you end a session, it prompts you, questioning if you want to store it for a later session.

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I'm running R on the cluster, not on my measly laptop, so an IDE is not what I'm looking for at the moment. –  xApple May 28 '13 at 8:31
    
@xApple RStudio also has a server version which you can install on the server and work with locally (through the web browser) –  hadley Jun 12 '13 at 13:34

You might consider emacs and ESS, which work fine over SSH and allow for the more usual (and generally considered more powerful) method of keeping useful commands in a separate file.

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could you comment more on cons and pros of using ESS and give a tutorial? –  RNA Feb 20 at 4:23
    
That would be a great answer, but unfortunately more than I am up to providing. My best answer is to find a friendly colleague who uses it and go from there. It's different enough from most "modern" programs that having a helping hand in person is especially helpful. –  Aaron Feb 20 at 13:08

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