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I have a MySQL Routine that is getting records within a 50 mile radius when passed Latitude and Longitude via utilizing the Haversin equation.

While this works great, and is pretty speedy (considering it's searching through 82k records), I am thinking that I can get better performance by creating a similar procedure utilizing a POINT column.

So, in my table I created an extra column called Location, gave it a datatype of POINT, updated my data to pass lat & lon to the Location column. Data is valid, and is fine., and added a Spatial Index

The question is, how can I convert the following query to use the Location column, instead of lat and lon columns.

SET @LAT := '37.953';
SET @LON := '-105.688';

SELECT DISTINCT
BPZ.`store_id`,         
3956 * 2 * ASIN(SQRT(POWER(SIN((@LAT - abs(Z.`lat`)) * pi()/180 / 2),2) + COS(@LAT * pi()/180 ) * COS(abs(Z.`lat`) *  pi()/180) * POWER(SIN((@LON - Z.`lon`) *  pi()/180 / 2), 2))) as distance,
c.`name`,c.`address`,c.`city`,c.`state`,c.`phone`,c.`zip`,c.`premise_type`
FROM
`zip_codes` as Z, 
`brand_product_zip` as BPZ
LEFT JOIN `customers` c ON c.`store_id` = BPZ.`store_id`
WHERE
BPZ.`zip` = Z.`zip`
AND 
3956 * 2 * ASIN(SQRT(POWER(SIN((@LAT - abs(Z.`lat`)) * pi()/180 / 2),2) + COS(@LAT * pi()/180 ) * COS(abs(Z.`lat`) *  pi()/180) * POWER(SIN((@LON - Z.`lon`) *  pi()/180 / 2), 2))) <= 50
ORDER BY
distance LIMIT 20

I understand that this has been asked before, however, everything I see points to calculations based on lat and lon and not the POINT column

Updated Code:

SET @lat = 41.92;
SET @lon = -72.65;
SET @kmRange = 80.4672; -- = 50 Miles

SELECT *, (3956 * 2 * ASIN(SQRT(POWER(SIN((@lat - abs(`lat`)) * pi()/180 / 2),2) + COS(@lat * pi()/180 ) * COS(abs(`lat`) *  pi()/180) * POWER(SIN((lon - `lon`) *  pi()/180 / 2), 2)))) as distance
FROM    `zip_codes`
WHERE   MBRContains(LineString(Point(@lat + @kmRange / 111.1, @lon + @kmRange / (111.1 / COS(RADIANS(@lat)))), Point(@lat - @kmRange / 111.1, @lon - @kmRange / (111.1 / COS(RADIANS(@lat))))), `Location`)
Order By distance
LIMIT 20
share|improve this question
    
if you can geocode you data into a point, how about just going after say LIMIT 5 or the like on your query when you are going after some close points –  Drew Pierce May 24 '13 at 12:48
    
really not sure what you are talking about and how it relates to my question. I need 20 records back from this, hence the LIMIT 20 –  Kevin May 24 '13 at 12:53
    
oh i wasnt even looking at your limit, sorry. so you have point data in your db. you create and index on it, and that is the focus of your where clause in the select (not lat and longitude) –  Drew Pierce May 24 '13 at 12:56
    
that is what I would like. Right now, both the where clause and the distance column are calculated with haversin based on the passed @LAT and @LON –  Kevin May 24 '13 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Have you looked into hilbert curves solutions? A spatial index doesn't deliver the exact solution? . With a mysql spatial index you can use mbrcontains:

CREATE TABLE lastcrawl (id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, pnt POINT NOT NULL) ENGINE=MyISAM;

INSERT
INTO    lastcrawl
VALUES  (1, POINT(40, -100));

SET @lat = 40;
SET @lon = -100;

SELECT  *
FROM    lastcrawl
WHERE   MBRContains
                (
                LineString
                        (
                        Point
                                 (
                                 @lat + 10 / 111.1,
                                 @lon + 10 / ( 111.1 / COS(RADIANS(@lat)))
                                 ),
                        Point    (
                                 @lat - 10 / 111.1,
                                 @lon - 10 / ( 111.1 / COS(RADIANS(@lat)))
                                 )
                        ),
                pnt
                );

Look here: MySQL - selecting near a spatial point. Here: http://www.drdobbs.com/database/space-filling-curves-in-geospatial-appli/184410998

share|improve this answer
    
Am I able to use that as a distance column as well? Also, what is the 111.1 for? Is that a potential km radius? –  Kevin May 29 '13 at 17:55
    
nah, guess I can't use it as a distance column... –  Kevin May 29 '13 at 17:58
    
111km is roughly a degree longitude: stackoverflow.com/questions/1006654/…. Basically yes it's getting the distance and sorting it. –  Phpdna May 29 '13 at 18:05
    
Per that question, it's the 10 in there that's the distance factor. How can I factor this into a distance column? See the original question, as I am a bit confused how to apply this. –  Kevin May 29 '13 at 18:11
    
Yes, I see. It's fetching a bounding box within 10 km square if you want exact distance you need apply the harvesine formula. It's cheaper to just the limit the bounding box. Why do you need exact solver? A spatial index is expensive. Look in my link with the hilbert curves. Hilbert curves are even more expensive. –  Phpdna May 29 '13 at 18:19

The article Nearest-location finder for MySQL explains in detail various options, and the best choice for use with the Spatial Extensions starting with MySQL 5.6.

From the article, this sample query lists zip codes within a 50 mile radius from given coordinates (42.81, -70.81):

SELECT zip, primary_city,
       latitude, longitude, distance_in_mi
  FROM (
SELECT zip, primary_city, latitude, longitude,r,
       69.0 * DEGREES(ACOS(COS(RADIANS(latpoint))
                 * COS(RADIANS(latitude))
                 * COS(RADIANS(longpoint) - RADIANS(longitude))
                 + SIN(RADIANS(latpoint))
                 * SIN(RADIANS(latitude)))) AS distance_in_mi
 FROM zip
 JOIN (
        SELECT  42.81  AS latpoint,  -70.81 AS longpoint, 50.0 AS r
   ) AS p
 WHERE latitude
  BETWEEN latpoint  - (r / 69)
      AND latpoint  + (r / 69)
   AND longitude
  BETWEEN longpoint - (r / (69 * COS(RADIANS(latpoint))))
      AND longpoint + (r / (69 * COS(RADIANS(latpoint))))
  ) d
 WHERE distance_in_mi <= r
 ORDER BY distance_in_mi;
share|improve this answer

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