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I've written a Windows Service in C# that basically checks my db every minute for orders, generates a PDF from these orders, and emails it.

The logic works perfectly in my tests etc..

When i create the service, and install it using the setup project, when I go to start the service in the services mmc, I get:

error 1053 the service did not respond to the start or control request in a timely fashion

My OnStart method looks like this:

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
    //writeToWindowsEventLog("Service started", EventLogEntryType.Information);
    timer.Enabled = true;
}

Basically, just enables the timer... so theres no process intensive call there.

Where am I going wrong?

I've tried setting the startup account to local system, network service etc... nothing works!

Edit:

Here is my code: (processPurchaseOrders is the method where the db is queried and pdf's are generated etc...)

public partial class PurchaseOrderDispatcher : ServiceBase
{
    //this is the main timer of the service
    private System.Timers.Timer timer;

    public PurchaseOrderDispatcher()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    // The main entry point for the process
    static void Main()
    {
      #if (!DEBUG)
        ServiceBase[] ServicesToRun;
        ServicesToRun = new ServiceBase[] { new PurchaseOrderDispatcher() };
        ServiceBase.Run(ServicesToRun);
      #else //debug code
        PurchaseOrderDispatcher service = new PurchaseOrderDispatcher();
        service.processPurchaseOrders();
      #endif
    }

    private void InitializeComponent()
    {
        this.CanPauseAndContinue = true;
        this.ServiceName = "Crocus_PurchaseOrderGenerator";
    }

    private void InitTimer()
    {
        timer = new System.Timers.Timer();

        //wire up the timer event
        timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);

        //set timer interval
        var timeInSeconds = Convert.ToInt32(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["TimerIntervalInSeconds"]);
        timer.Interval = (timeInSeconds * 1000); // timer.Interval is in milliseconds, so times above by 1000

        timer.Enabled = true;
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (components != null))
            components.Dispose();

        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        //instantiate timer
        Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(this.InitTimer));
        t.Start();
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        //turn off the timer.
        timer.Enabled = false;
    }

    protected override void OnPause()
    {
        timer.Enabled = false;

        base.OnPause();
    }

    protected override void OnContinue()
    {
        timer.Enabled = true;

        base.OnContinue();
    }

    protected void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        processPurchaseOrders();
    }
}
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3  
What's in your constructor though? The problem could be there. –  C. Ross Nov 4 '09 at 12:44
    
all i have in my contstructor is this.CanPauseAndContinue = true; this.ServiceName = "Crocus_PurchaseOrderGenerator"; –  Alex Nov 4 '09 at 13:49
1  
Where do you instantiate the timer? Take a look at the example I posted below (clifgriffin.com/2008/11/20/using-timers-in-a-c-windows-service) of how to setup the timer in a windows service –  SwDevMan81 Nov 4 '09 at 13:59
    
i edited the question and added all the code.... –  Alex Nov 4 '09 at 15:24
    
I updated my answer with a complete example using most of your code. It started fine and I was able to attach and see that the event was firing. –  SwDevMan81 Nov 4 '09 at 17:32
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

From MSDN:
"Do not use the constructor to perform processing that should be in OnStart. Use OnStart to handle all initialization of your service. The constructor is called when the application's executable runs, not when the service runs. The executable runs before OnStart. When you continue, for example, the constructor is not called again because the SCM already holds the object in memory. If OnStop releases resources allocated in the constructor rather than in OnStart, the needed resources would not be created again the second time the service is called."

If your timer is not initialized in the OnStart call, this could be a problem. I would also check the type of timer, make sure its a System.Timers.Timer for Services. Here is an example of how to setup the timer in a windows service.

//TODONT: Use a Windows Service just to run a scheduled process

I tried your code, and it seems ok. The only difference I had was to hard code the timer value (Service1.cs). Let me know if the below doesnt work.

Service1.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.ServiceProcess;
using System.Text;
using System.Timers;
using System.Threading;

namespace WindowsServiceTest
{
    public partial class Service1 : ServiceBase
    {
        private System.Timers.Timer timer;

        public Service1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
        {
            //instantiate timer
            Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(this.InitTimer)); 
            t.Start();
        }

        protected override void OnStop()
        {
            timer.Enabled = false;
        }

         private void InitTimer()  
         {     
             timer = new System.Timers.Timer();  
             //wire up the timer event 
             timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed); 
             //set timer interval   
             //var timeInSeconds = Convert.ToInt32(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["TimerIntervalInSeconds"]); 
             double timeInSeconds = 3.0;
             timer.Interval = (timeInSeconds * 1000); 
             // timer.Interval is in milliseconds, so times above by 1000 
             timer.Enabled = true;  
         }

        protected void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e) 
        {
            int timer_fired = 0;
        }
    }
}

Service1.Designer.cs

namespace WindowsServiceTest
{
    partial class Service1
    {
        /// <summary> 
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Component Designer generated code

        /// <summary> 
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify 
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            components = new System.ComponentModel.Container();
            this.ServiceName = "Service1";
            this.CanPauseAndContinue = true;
        }

        #endregion
    }
}

I just created a blank Windows Service project and add the below so I could run installutil.exe and attach to the above to see if the event was firing (and it did).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.ServiceProcess;

namespace WindowsServiceTest
{
    [RunInstaller(true)]
    public class MyServiceInstaller : System.Configuration.Install.Installer
    {
        public MyServiceInstaller()
        {
            ServiceProcessInstaller process = new ServiceProcessInstaller();

            process.Account = ServiceAccount.LocalSystem;

            ServiceInstaller serviceAdmin = new ServiceInstaller();

            serviceAdmin.StartType = ServiceStartMode.Manual;
            serviceAdmin.ServiceName = "Service1";
            serviceAdmin.DisplayName = "Service1 Display Name";
            Installers.Add(process);
            Installers.Add(serviceAdmin);
        }
    }
}
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I just had the same problem.

It turned out it was because I was running it as a console indebug mode - like the code you have above

#if (!DEBUG)

#else //debug code

#endif

And I had compiled it in debug mode and installed the service

When I compiled it in release mode it worked as expected

Hope this helps

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I go to the server console (in the server room) and start the service from there. Remote in wont' work.

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Also had this error until I found out that there's an excess ">" character on my .config file.

So, try to double check your .config file first before punching your computer ;)

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Its always a good idea to just rename the config to xml and open it in the default xml viewer to let it check for errors. –  Malcolm Frexner Jan 16 at 8:25
    
Personally I would suggest choosing "Open with" from the context menu (and make sure to untick "always open with this application"). Might be easier, in the long run, than renaming the file back and forth. –  Cornelius Apr 4 at 16:21
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The constructor was the issue for me. The constructor must have been throwing an excpetion about missing DLLs.

My issue: my inexperience with creating installers. I didn't have the dependent DLLs being copied into the install folder (I needed to select Release build configuration when creating Primary Project Output).

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In case anyone else runs across this in the future, I received the same Error 1053 when trying to start a Windows service that I created on Windows Server 2012.

The issue ended up being that the service was developed targeting the .NET framework 4.5.1, but the Windows Server 2012 instance did not have that version of the .NET framework installed. Backing the service down to target .NET 4.0 fixed the error.

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