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I have a jQuery script that toggles a navigation menu, and then closes it after five seconds:

<script>
  $(function() {
    function toggleMenu() {
      $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle( "blind", 500 );
    };
     $( ".nav-open" ).click(function() {
      toggleMenu();
      setTimeout(function(){
         $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle( "blind", 500 );
     }, 5000);
    });
  });
  </script>

It works great.

I also want the menu to close when the user clicks on one of the links:

 <script>
  $(function() {
    function closeMenu() {
      $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle( "blind", 500 );
    };
     $( ".nav-close" ).click(function() {
      closeMenu();
      return false;
    });
  });
  </script>

It works great, as well.

The problem is that if the when the user clicks on the link, the timer is still running. When it hits the 5 second mark, it toggles, so the menu reappears. Then, if the user clicks on the element that shows the menu, it closes it, but restarts the timer, the menu appears after five seconds, and everything gets out of whack.

How can get the second script to cancel the timer in the first script, or am I just going about all of this the wrong way?

Thanks in advance for any assistance!

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1  
use clearTimeout –  Chris Till May 24 '13 at 13:52
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use this:

$(function() {
    var timer, menuNav = $("#menu-nav");

    function toggleNav(){ menuNav.toggle("blind", 500); }

    $( ".nav-open" ).click(function() {
        toggleNav();
        timer = setTimeout(function(){
            toggleNav();
        }, 5000);
    });
    $( ".nav-close" ).click(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        window.clearTimeout(timer);
        toggleNav();
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent solution! Works like a charm! Thank you! –  Ty Morton May 24 '13 at 14:05
    
this solution works, but I think it has timing problems and it does not make good use of jquery animation queue –  Khanh TO May 24 '13 at 23:54
    
@KhanhTo - I understand your point but I can't see the timing problems you refer to. Personally, I think my answer is a fairly clean and efficient way of solving the OP's problem. –  Joe May 25 '13 at 11:04
    
you would see that if the setTimeout were 500, which means toggle again immediately when the first toggle completes. –  Khanh TO May 25 '13 at 11:33
    
yes, I do agree with you this solution is clean and solve the OP's problem. –  Khanh TO May 25 '13 at 11:35
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// when setting the timer
var id = setTimeout(...);

// before executing any other task, cancel timer:
clearTimeout(id);
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Don't use toggle(), use show() and hide() instead.

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That would certainly make things easier, but the client also wants the menu to close if the user clicks the trigger element, after it's been opened. –  Ty Morton May 24 '13 at 14:20
    
Ok, then maybe you can check if menu element it is visible with $(element).is(":visible")? If it is visible then hide it, if not - show it. –  Edo May 24 '13 at 14:52
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I think your first code block has timing problems. But in your case, it does not show up because the timeout value (5000) is greater than the animation value (500). As I understand, you use setTimeout to toggle again when the animation completes, but a better way to do this is to provide a callback function.

<script>
  $(function() {
    function toggleMenu() {
      $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle( "blind", 500, function(){ 
               setTimeout(function(){
                           $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle( "blind", 500 );
                          }, 4500);
           });
    };
     $( ".nav-open" ).click(function() {
      toggleMenu();
    });
  });
  </script>

Or even better by putting a delay in the queue

<script>
      $(function() {
        function toggleMenu() {
          $( "#menu-nav" ).toggle("blind", 500)
                          .delay(4500)
                          .toggle("blind",500);
        };
         $( ".nav-open" ).click(function() {
          toggleMenu();
        });
      });
 </script>

With this approach, your script to closeMenu is as simple as:

$(function() {
    function closeMenu() {
      $( "#menu-nav" ).stop(true,true).toggle( "blind", 500 );
    };
     $( ".nav-close" ).click(function() {
      closeMenu();
      return false;
    });
  });

It's not a big deal, just an opinion to make it better. Forgive me if this does not answer your main question.

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