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I'm trying to make an overload with auto return type (C++11)

I already read C++ template operator overloading with different types, but that's not exactly that I'm trying to do.

I have a class like this:

template<typename T>
class Attr
{
    public:
    Attr(const T& v) : value(v) {};

    typedef T type;
    T value;
}

Now i try to add some operator (=,+,-,*,/,%) with auto return type, so I add inside Attr this code:

template<typename U> T& operator=(const U& v){value=v;return value;};  //work

template<typename U>
auto operator+(const U& v) -> std::decltype(Attr<T>::type+v) const //line 29
{
  return value+v;
}; //fail

I try to replace std::decltype(Attr<T>::type+v) with:

  • std::decltype(value+v)
  • std::decltype(Attr<T>::value+v)
  • std::decltype(T()+v)

And I also try to remove const, but no change, I always have these errors:

ORM/Attr.hpp:29:47: erreur: expected type-specifier
ORM/Attr.hpp:29:47: erreur: expected initializer

EDIT: First, decltype is not a member of std.

It should be:

template<typename U> auto operator+(const U& v)const -> decltype(value+v) {return value-v;};

Final code:

template<typename T>
class Attr
{
    public:
    Attr(const T& v) : value(v) {};

    typedef T type;
    T value;

    template<typename U> auto operator+(const U& v)const -> decltype(value+v) {return value-v;};
}
share|improve this question
1  
Try replacing std::decltype(Attr<T>::type+v) with decltype(value+v). –  gx_ May 24 '13 at 13:56
    
@gx_: that won't work I'm afraid, because you can't access member variable outside of a member function body. You need to use std::declval –  Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 13:58
    
Yes, it compile whene i remove std::. Thanks. –  Krozark May 24 '13 at 13:58
    
@AndyProwl I'm admittedly not yet an expert in the C++11 standard, but are you sure about that? It appears that the function definitions are meant to reside in the class definition, shouldn't value be visible? –  jerry May 24 '13 at 14:16
1  
@jerry: Right, I shall correct myself: only names of members declared before the use of this outside the body of a member function are visible. I placed the operators before the declaration of value, which is why I was getting a compiler error. Sorry about the confusion –  Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 14:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First problem

There is no such a thing as std::decltype. decltype is a keyword. Secondly, inside the decltype expression you are trying to add an object and a type. Although I understand what you meant to do, for the compiler, that is non-sense.

You could use std::declval<> for that purpose:

template<typename U>
auto operator+(const U& v) ->
    decltype(std::declval<T>()+v) const //line 29
{
    return value+v;
};

Or, if you have declared your value data member before the point where you are referring to it outside the body of a member function, you could do:

template<typename U>
auto operator+(const U& v) ->
    decltype(value + v) const
//           ^^^^^
//           Valid only if the "value" data member has been declared before
{
    return value+v;
};

Second problem

Usually, operator + is defined as a (possibly friend) free function, not as a member function, so that you could actually make it work even when the object of your type is not being passed as the first operand.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. But apparently, declval is not needed to make it work, just remove std::. –  Krozark May 24 '13 at 14:10
    
@Krozark: Uhm, that's very strange. decltype(value+v) should not compile in that context. Perhaps this is a non-standard extension of your compiler –  Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 14:11
    
I use gcc version 4.6.3 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) , with "g++ -g -std=c++0x -o ... -c ..." –  Krozark May 24 '13 at 14:20
    
@Krozark: Yep, sorry, I made a mistake - shame on my, I suck, etc. ;) The restriction is that members accessed through the this pointer outside the body of a member function must have been declared before. When trying to reproduce the problem, I placed the member operators before the declaration of value, and therefore I was getting a compiler error. You most likely have your operators defined after the declaration of value. –  Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 14:24
    
" You most likely have your operators defined after the declaration of value" Yes it is. –  Krozark May 24 '13 at 14:27

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