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For a heuristic algorithm I need to evaluate, one after the other, the combinations of a certain set until I reach a stop criterion.

Since they are a lot, at the moment I'm generating them using the following memory efficient iterator block (inspired by python's itertools.combinations):

public static IEnumerable<T[]> GetCombinations<T>(this IList<T> pool, int r)
{
    int n = pool.Count;
    if (r > n)
        throw new ArgumentException("r cannot be greater than pool size");
    int[] indices = Enumerable.Range(0, r).ToArray();
    yield return indices.Select(idx => pool[idx]).ToArray();
    while (true)
    {
        int i;
        for (i = r - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            if (indices[i] != i + n - r)
                break;
        if (i < 0)
            break;
        indices[i] += 1;
        for (int j = i + 1; j < r; j++)
            indices[j] = indices[j - 1] + 1;
        yield return indices.Select(idx => pool[idx]).ToArray();
    }
}

The problem is, to greatly improve the efficiency of my heuristic, I'd need to generate these combinations sorted by the sum of they indexes (in other words I need to generate first, the combinations containing the first elements of the set).

e.g.
Consider the set S = {0,1,2,3,4,5}
(I choose this set for simplicity since elements and their indexes coincide).
All possible combinations of r=4 numbers generated from the given algorithm are:

(0, 1, 2, 3)  SUM:  6
(0, 1, 2, 4)  SUM:  7
(0, 1, 2, 5)  SUM:  8
(0, 1, 3, 4)  SUM:  8
(0, 1, 3, 5)  SUM:  9
(0, 1, 4, 5)  SUM: 10
(0, 2, 3, 4)  SUM:  9
(0, 2, 3, 5)  SUM: 10
(0, 2, 4, 5)  SUM: 11
(0, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 12
(1, 2, 3, 4)  SUM: 10
(1, 2, 3, 5)  SUM: 11
(1, 2, 4, 5)  SUM: 12
(1, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 13
(2, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 14

where, as you can see, the combinations are not strictly sorted by ascending sum.

The desired outcome is instead the following :
(the order of the combinations having the same sum is not important)

(0, 1, 2, 3)  SUM:  6
(0, 1, 2, 4)  SUM:  7
(0, 1, 2, 5)  SUM:  8
(0, 1, 3, 4)  SUM:  8
(0, 1, 3, 5)  SUM:  9
(0, 2, 3, 4)  SUM:  9
(0, 1, 4, 5)  SUM: 10
(0, 2, 3, 5)  SUM: 10
(1, 2, 3, 4)  SUM: 10
(0, 2, 4, 5)  SUM: 11
(1, 2, 3, 5)  SUM: 11
(0, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 12
(1, 2, 4, 5)  SUM: 12
(1, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 13
(2, 3, 4, 5)  SUM: 14

A trivial solution would be to generate all the combinations then sort them according to their sum; but this is not really efficient/feasible since the number of combinations becomes huge as n grows.

I also had a quick look to combinatorial Gray Codes but I couldn't find anyone suitable for this problem.

Do you have an idea on how to implement something like this ?

EDIT :

This problem has an alternate (unfortunately not easier) formulation.
Given a set S and a number r, all the possible sums are trivial to find, since they are simply all the numbers from the sum of the first r elements of S to the sum of the last r elements of S.

That being said, if, for each sum T we can efficiently¹ find all the combinations having sum T we solve the original problem since we simply generate them in ascending order.

¹ efficiently means that I don't want to generate all the combinations and discard the ones having a different sum.

EDIT 2:

After @EricLippert suggestion I created the following code:

public static IEnumerable<T[]> 
GetCombinationsSortedByIndexSum<T>(this IList<T> pool, int r)
{
    int n = pool.Count;
    if (r > n)
        throw new ArgumentException("r cannot be greater than pool size");
    int minSum = ((r - 1) * r) / 2;
    int maxSum = (n * (n + 1)) / 2 - ((n - r - 1) * (n - r)) / 2;

    for (int sum = minSum; sum <= maxSum; sum++)
    {
        foreach (var indexes in AllMonotIncrSubseqOfLenMWhichSumToN(0, n - 1, r, sum))
            yield return indexes.Select(x => pool[x]).ToArray();
    }
}

static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>> 
AllMonotIncrSubseqOfLenMWhichSumToN(int seqFirstElement, int seqLastElement, int m, int n)
{
    for (int i = seqFirstElement; i <= seqLastElement - m + 1; i++)
    {
        if (m == 1)
        {
            if (i == n)
                yield return new int[] { i };
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (var el in AllMonotIncrSubseqOfLenMWhichSumToN(i + 1, seqLastElement, m - 1, n - i))
                yield return new int[] { i }.Concat(el);
        }
    }
}

This works fine (hopefully is what Eric meant :P) but I'm still concerned about the complexity of the recursive method. In fact it seems that we're regenerating all the combinations for each sum discarding the ones not summing up to the desired value.

To reduce the complexity of the inner function I found a way to limit the iterations by using effective upper and lower bounds (and now it's really hard to say what is the complexity of this).

Check my answer to see the final code.

share|improve this question
    
does not answer your question as stated but would you be open to using an OrderedDictionary or perhaps even just a simple Dictionary<int, List<int[]>> which you could use to store groups of sets that have the same sum ? –  wal May 24 '13 at 14:34
    
@wal: well, as I said I can't store the combinations since they're too many. Anyway, if you have a fast way to generate all the combinations having a certain sum that would be an alternate solution to my problem :) –  digEmAll May 24 '13 at 14:37
    
if you dont have an issue calculating them but dont want to store them all can you just discard/ignore that dont have the SUM youre looking for? –  wal May 24 '13 at 14:42
2  
This problem can be efficiently solved but I don't have time today to type up a lengthy sketch. A brief sketch is: can you write a recursive method called AllMonotonicallyIncreasingSubsequencesOfLengthMWhichSumToN(Sequence<int>, int m, int n) ? If you can write that recursive method then you can solve your problem. –  Eric Lippert May 24 '13 at 17:04
1  
The recursive base cases are obvious when the length m is zero or the sum is negative. The recursive case is: for each element in the sequence, remove it and produce the sequence which is the tail of the sequence -- the elements after that element. Now, recurse: what are all the subsequences of length m-1 from the tail that add to n minus the removed element? Once you have that set of sequences, you've solved your problem. –  Eric Lippert May 24 '13 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The solution I had in mind was:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
class Program
{
  // Preconditions:
  // * items is a sequence of non-negative monotone increasing integers
  // * n is the number of items to be in the subsequence
  // * sum is the desired sum of that subsequence.
  // Result:
  // A sequence of subsequences of the original sequence where each 
  // subsequence has n items and the given sum.
  static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>> M(IEnumerable<int> items, int sum, int n)
  {
    // Let's start by taking some easy outs. If the sum is negative
    // then there is no solution. If the number of items in the
    // subsequence is negative then there is no solution.

    if (sum < 0 || n < 0)
      yield break;

    // If the number of items in the subsequence is zero then
    // the only possible solution is if the sum is zero.

    if (n == 0)
    {
      if (sum == 0)
        yield return Enumerable.Empty<int>();
      yield break;
    }

    // If the number of items is less than the required number of 
    // items, there is no solution.

    if (items.Count() < n)
      yield break;

    // We have at least n items in the sequence, and
    // and n is greater than zero, so First() is valid:

    int first = items.First();

    // We need n items from a monotone increasing subsequence
    // that have a particular sum. We might already be too 
    // large to meet that requirement:

    if (n * first > sum)
      yield break;

    // There might be some solutions that involve the first element.
    // Find them all.

    foreach(var subsequence in M(items.Skip(1), sum - first, n - 1))
      yield return new[]{first}.Concat(subsequence);      

    // And there might be some solutions that do not involve the first element.
    // Find them all.

    foreach(var subsequence in M(items.Skip(1), sum, n))
      yield return subsequence;
  }
  static void Main()
  {
    int[] x = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (int i = 0; i <= 15; ++i)
      foreach(var seq in M(x, i, 4))
        Console.WriteLine("({0}) SUM {1}", string.Join(",", seq), i);
  }
}       

The output is your desired output.

I've made no attempt to optimize this. It would be interesting to profile it and see where most of the time is spent.

UPDATE: Just for fun I wrote a version that uses an immutable stack instead of an arbitrary enumerable. Enjoy!

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

abstract class ImmutableList<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
  public static readonly ImmutableList<T> Empty = new EmptyList();
  private ImmutableList() {}  
  public abstract bool IsEmpty { get; }
  public abstract T Head { get; }
  public abstract ImmutableList<T> Tail { get; }
  public ImmutableList<T> Push(T newHead)
  {
    return new List(newHead, this);
  }  

  private sealed class EmptyList : ImmutableList<T>
  {
    public override bool IsEmpty { get { return true; } }
    public override T Head { get { throw new InvalidOperationException(); } }
    public override ImmutableList<T> Tail { get { throw new InvalidOperationException(); } }
  }
  private sealed class List : ImmutableList<T>
  {
    private readonly T head;
    private readonly ImmutableList<T> tail;
    public override bool IsEmpty { get { return false; } }
    public override T Head { get { return head; } }
    public override ImmutableList<T> Tail { get { return tail; } }
    public List(T head, ImmutableList<T> tail)
    {
      this.head = head;
      this.tail = tail;
    }
  }
  System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
  {
    return this.GetEnumerator();
  }
  public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
  {
    for (ImmutableList<T> current = this; !current.IsEmpty; current = current.Tail)
      yield return current.Head;
  }
}  

class Program
{
  // Preconditions:
  // * items is a sequence of non-negative monotone increasing integers
  // * n is the number of items to be in the subsequence
  // * sum is the desired sum of that subsequence.
  // Result:
  // A sequence of subsequences of the original sequence where each 
  // subsequence has n items and the given sum.
  static IEnumerable<ImmutableList<int>> M(ImmutableList<int> items, int sum, int n)
  {
    // Let's start by taking some easy outs. If the sum is negative
    // then there is no solution. If the number of items in the
    // subsequence is negative then there is no solution.

    if (sum < 0 || n < 0)
      yield break;

    // If the number of items in the subsequence is zero then
    // the only possible solution is if the sum is zero.
    if (n == 0)
    {
      if (sum == 0)
        yield return ImmutableList<int>.Empty;
      yield break;
    }

    // If the number of items is less than the required number of 
    // items, there is no solution.

    if (items.Count() < n)
      yield break;

    // We have at least n items in the sequence, and
    // and n is greater than zero.
    int first = items.Head;

    // We need n items from a monotone increasing subsequence
    // that have a particular sum. We might already be too 
    // large to meet that requirement:

    if (n * first > sum)
      yield break;

    // There might be some solutions that involve the first element.
    // Find them all.

    foreach(var subsequence in M(items.Tail, sum - first, n - 1))
      yield return subsequence.Push(first);      

    // And there might be some solutions that do not involve the first element.
    // Find them all.
    foreach(var subsequence in M(items.Tail, sum, n))
      yield return subsequence;
  }
  static void Main()
  {
    ImmutableList<int> x = ImmutableList<int>.Empty.Push(5).
                           Push(4).Push(3).Push(2).Push(1).Push(0);
    for (int i = 0; i <= 15; ++i)
      foreach(var seq in M(x, i, 4))
        Console.WriteLine("({0}) SUM {1}", string.Join(",", seq), i);
  }
}       
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason why are you writing your own immutable stack instead of using the one from Microsoft.Bcl.Immutable? –  svick May 26 '13 at 0:04
2  
@svick: It's more pedagogic this way. –  Eric Lippert May 26 '13 at 1:35
    
Thanks that's very useful (and the immutable stack part is really interesting) :) It is pretty similar to my approach actually, I just exploited the fact that, in my particular case, sequences are always consecutive increasing integers. Hence, I can generate effective lowerbounds (see my last edit) which cut down the number of recursions a lot and is much faster. Anyway, I'll accept this since it's the origin of my final code :) –  digEmAll May 26 '13 at 9:30

If the worst case you are looking at is 35 choose 10, that would yield 183,579,396 unique combinations according to this binomial coefficient calculator, which is the best free one I have found on the web so far. Most modern CPUs should be able to go through this in at most a second or 2 - depending on the language and not counting the time for the sort. With C++, it would probably be well under a second. If going the C++ route, then you would probably want to make it a dll and invoke it through a platform invoke (P/I). There are also some sorts out there that have superior performance with lists that are mostly sorted, which looks like the case here.

If under a second is still too slow, you might consider pre-calculating all of the N choose K cases you need and write them out to a file (after applying the sort based upon the sum of the k-indexes) and then reading the file(s) in at program start up. Depending on the application and where it will be hosted, this might not be too practical if it is for a Windows CE platform with limited memory for example. But, for a pc or other system with a good amount of hard disk space, it should not be a problem.

In answer to your question about what I meant by "specify an index into the set":

I have written a C# class that can take an index into a sorted binomial coefficient table and return the corresponding k-indexes for that index without having to iterate through all the combinations before it. There is another method that does the reverse and returns the corresponding index (or rank) for the given k-indexes. The rank starts at zero, and in your example above would specify the k-indexes of 0, 1, 2, 3. Rank 1 would be for k-indexes 0, 1, 2, 4, and so on. So, for example in the 35 choose 10 case, if you know that you need the k-indexes for everything past 150,000,000, then you don't need to iterate through the first 150M to get the values after that. You can call the class method and pass 150000000 as the index and it would return the k-indexes for that index. The methods are highly optimized and are based upon a mathematical relationship that can be seen in Pascal's Triangle.

The class is written in .NET C# and provides a way to manage the objects related to the problem (if any) by using a generic list. The constructor of this class takes a bool value called InitTable that when true will create a generic list to hold the objects to be managed. If this value is false, then it will not create the table. The table does not need to be created in order to use the translation methods listed above. Accessor methods are provided to access the table.

There is an associated test class which shows how to use the class and its methods. It has been extensively tested with at least 2 cases and there are no known bugs.

To read about this class and download the code, see Tablizing The Binomial Coeffieicent.

The following tested code will iterate through each unique combination:

public void Test10Choose5()
{
   String S;
   int Loop;
   int N = 10;  // Total number of elements in the set.
   int K = 5;  // Total number of elements in each group.
   // Create the bin coeff object required to get all
   // the combos for this N choose K combination.
   BinCoeff<int> BC = new BinCoeff<int>(N, K, false);
   int NumCombos = BinCoeff<int>.GetBinCoeff(N, K);
   // The Kindexes array specifies the indexes for a lexigraphic element.
   int[] KIndexes = new int[K];
   StringBuilder SB = new StringBuilder();
   // Loop thru all the combinations for this N choose K case.
   for (int Combo = 0; Combo < NumCombos; Combo++)
   {
      // Get the k-indexes for this combination.  
      BC.GetKIndexes(Combo, KIndexes);
      // Verify that the Kindexes returned can be used to retrive the
      // rank or lexigraphic order of the KIndexes in the table.
      int Val = BC.GetIndex(true, KIndexes);
      if (Val != Combo)
      {
         S = "Val of " + Val.ToString() + " != Combo Value of " + Combo.ToString();
         Console.WriteLine(S);
      }
      SB.Remove(0, SB.Length);
      for (Loop = 0; Loop < K; Loop++)
      {
         SB.Append(KIndexes[Loop].ToString());
         if (Loop < K - 1)
            SB.Append(" ");
      }
      S = "KIndexes = " + SB.ToString();
      Console.WriteLine(S);
   }
}

Make sure that you use the class's version of GetBinCoeff that implements Mark Dominus version of calculating the number of combinations. It uses long values and the code is much less likely to overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, it's really interesting :) However, I can't accept it since my goal was to find a way to generate the combinations without storing them or generating them more than once discarding the ones I don't want. Eric Lippert seems to have given me the right hint :) –  digEmAll May 24 '13 at 19:09

For the sake of completeness and clarity I'll post my final code:

// Given a pool of elements returns all the 
// combinations of the groups of lenght r in pool, 
// such that the combinations are ordered (ascending) by the sum of 
// the indexes of the elements.
// e.g. pool = {A,B,C,D,E} r = 3
// returns
// (A, B, C)   indexes: (0, 1, 2)   sum: 3
// (A, B, D)   indexes: (0, 1, 3)   sum: 4
// (A, B, E)   indexes: (0, 1, 4)   sum: 5
// (A, C, D)   indexes: (0, 2, 3)   sum: 5
// (A, C, E)   indexes: (0, 2, 4)   sum: 6
// (B, C, D)   indexes: (1, 2, 3)   sum: 6
// (A, D, E)   indexes: (0, 3, 4)   sum: 7
// (B, C, E)   indexes: (1, 2, 4)   sum: 7
// (B, D, E)   indexes: (1, 3, 4)   sum: 8
// (C, D, E)   indexes: (2, 3, 4)   sum: 9
public static IEnumerable<T[]>
GetCombinationsSortedByIndexSum<T>(this IList<T> pool, int r)
{
    int n = pool.Count;
    if (r > n)
        throw new ArgumentException("r cannot be greater than pool size");
    int minSum = F(r - 1);
    int maxSum = F(n) - F(n - r - 1);

    for (int sum = minSum; sum <= maxSum; sum++)
    {
        foreach (var indexes in AllSubSequencesWithGivenSum(0, n - 1, r, sum))
            yield return indexes.Select(x => pool[x]).ToArray();
    }
}


// Given a start element and a last element of a sequence of consecutive integers
// returns all the monotonically increasing subsequences of length "m" having sum "sum"
// e.g. seqFirstElement = 1, seqLastElement = 5, m = 3, sum = 8
//      returns {1,2,5} and {1,3,4}
static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>>
AllSubSequencesWithGivenSum(int seqFirstElement, int seqLastElement, int m, int sum)
{
    int lb = sum - F(seqLastElement) + F(seqLastElement - m + 1);
    int ub = sum - F(seqFirstElement + m - 1) + F(seqFirstElement);

    lb = Math.Max(seqFirstElement, lb);
    ub = Math.Min(seqLastElement - m + 1, ub);

    for (int i = lb; i <= ub; i++)
    {
        if (m == 1)
        {
            if (i == sum) // this check shouldn't be necessary anymore since LB/UB should automatically exclude wrong solutions
                yield return new int[] { i };
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (var el in AllSubSequencesWithGivenSum(i + 1, seqLastElement, m - 1, sum - i))
                yield return new int[] { i }.Concat(el);
        }
    }
}

// Formula to compute the sum of the numbers from 0 to n
// e.g. F(4) = 0 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 10
static int F(int n)
{
    return (n * (n + 1)) / 2;
}
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