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I want to do validate xml with some unknown field and some required fields, but I do not know how to do this. I tried using the xs:any element, but it did not work.

<orders>
  <order>
    <require1>**</require1>
    <require2>**</require2>
    <unknow>***</unknow>
   </order>
   <order>
     <require1>**</require1>
     <require2>**</require2>
     <unknow1>***</unknow1>
     <unknow2>***</unknow2>
   </order>

...

My XSD is :

<xs:element name="orders">
  <xs:complexType>
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element name="order" 
                  maxOccurs="unbounded" 
                  minOccurs="0">
        <xs:complexType>
         <xs:choice maxOccurs="unbounded" minOccurs="2">
           <xs:any namespace="##other" 
                   minOccurs="0" 
                   maxOccurs="unbounded" 
                   processContents="lax"/>
           <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require1"/>
           <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require2"/>

....

but it does not work : cvc-complex-type.2.4.a : Contenu non valide trouvé à partir

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What's going wrong? None of your XML data is namespace-qualified. That is: you neither declare nor use any namespace prefixes, and you have no default namespace declared, so all the names (orders, order, require1, require2, unknow, unknow1, unknow2) are unqualified.

But your xs:any wildcard specifies namespace="##other", which means it matches only elements which are (a) namespace-qualified and (b) not in the target namespace of the schema document where the wildcard is used.

One solution: if you want orders etc. to be non-qualified, require that the unknown additional elements be namespace-qualified:

<orders xmlns:other="http://example.com/other">
    <order>
      <require1>**</require1>
      <require2>**</require2>
      <other:unknow>***</other:unknow>
    </order>
    <order>
      <require1>**</require1>
      <require2>**</require2>
      <other:unknow1>***</other:unknow1>
      <other:unknow2>***</other:unknow2>
    </order>      
</orders>

Or give your schema document a target namespace and require that additional elements be in a different namespace.

Another solution would be to change the wildcard to say namespace="##any" -- that would require XSD 1.1 (since otherwise the content model would violate the 'Unique Particle Attribution' rule). If you use XSD 1.1, you can also say more cleanly what you seem to want to say, namely that require1 and require2 are both required and each must occur exactly once, while zero or more other elements can also appear.

<xs:complexType>
  <xs:all>
    <xs:any namespace="##any" 
            minOccurs="0" 
            maxOccurs="unbounded" 
            processContents="lax"/>
    <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require1"/>
    <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require2"/>
  </xs:all>
</xs:complexType>

If you must be in XSD 1.0, you would get better validation if you used xs:sequence and not xs:choice:

<xs:element name="orders">
  <xs:complexType>
    <xs:sequence>
      <xs:element name="order" 
        maxOccurs="unbounded" 
        minOccurs="0">
        <xs:complexType>
          <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require1"/>
            <xs:element type="xs:string" name="require2"/>
            <xs:any namespace="##any" 
              minOccurs="0" 
              maxOccurs="unbounded" 
              processContents="lax"/>
          </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType>
      </xs:element>
    </xs:sequence>
  </xs:complexType>
</xs:element>

This guarantees that your required elements each occur exactly once and that other elements are allowed. It does require that other elements come at the end and not before or between the required elements, which some people regard as a drawback. But unless the sequence of elements conveys information, there is no particular requirement to allow it to vary.

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the god of xsd has answers ... thank Sperberg –  timactive May 29 '13 at 20:55

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