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I have the following jquery .one() code:

$("<div class='one'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");
$("<div class='one'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");
$("<div class='one'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");

$("#mane").one("click", ".one", function(event){
     alert(1);
});

Why is it called once? And not once per item? In the documentation .one() function is called once per item?

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/74cv9/

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You only have one item - #mane. That's where the event is bound to –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:24
    
Cause it's delegated to the #name element. –  adeneo May 24 '13 at 14:24
    
there is only one event bound, to one element. That one event can only happen once. –  Kevin B May 24 '13 at 14:25
    
@j08691 - yes it does! –  adeneo May 24 '13 at 14:27
1  
I don't even know why I asked that. Ug, TGIF. –  j08691 May 24 '13 at 14:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I don't think this functionality is built in, so you'll have to do it yourself:

$("#mane").on("click", ".one", function(event){
    if ( !$(this).data('clicked') ) {

        // do your stuff here, this .one element hasn't been clicked before



        $(this).data('clicked', true);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
jsfiddle.net/2pKah (already was working on it) –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:30
    
It's seems that it should be build in ? Should this be mention to the jQuery team or do you think they are aware of it? –  CezarisLT May 24 '13 at 14:41
    
@Jessica Why should it be built in? It doesn't make sense to. The way .one() works with your code makes sense - only execute the handler once for any descendant .one clicked. You bound the event to #mane. Clicking anywhere inside of #mane causes the event to bubble. The handler will execute once only if the event originated from a .one descendant. Look at this fiddle - jsfiddle.net/bQ2wG . Notice how clicking the .two element does nothing. –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:44
    
@Ian one() doesn't make much sense for delegated events with it's current functionality. –  CezarisLT May 24 '13 at 14:46
1  
@Jessica For example, this could be used: jsfiddle.net/Kj3V7 . It only works for the specific parameters events, selector, handler (which is what you are using), and is just an example –  Ian May 24 '13 at 15:02

The event is bound to a single element #mane and therefore will only happen to that element once, regardless of how many elements you delegate it to. An easy way around this is to use .on instead and an additional selector whether it be a class, attribute, etc, something that can be removed/changed after the event happens:

$("<div class='one clickable'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");
$("<div class='one clickable'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");
$("<div class='one clickable'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");

$("#mane").on("click", ".one.clickable", function(event){
     alert(1);
     $(this).removeClass("clickable");
});
share|improve this answer
    
but wont it mean that the click event is fired every time '.one' is clicked? Seems an incorrect solution to me –  Mandeep Jain May 24 '13 at 14:32
    
@MandeepJain a click event is fired regardless, however we're changing whether or not we catch the event. In this case, we will only catch the event once per .one element. –  Kevin B May 24 '13 at 14:32
    
@MandeepJain As soon as the clickable class is removed (which happens when it's first clicked), the handler won't execute for that .one element. –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:32
    
but using .one() i think jquery itself unbinds the event after executing it once, right? So why fire unnecessary calls ? –  Mandeep Jain May 24 '13 at 14:35
2  
@MandeepJain because .one will unbind itself too early in this case. in my opinion .one doesn't make much sense for delegated events with it's current functionality. –  Kevin B May 24 '13 at 14:35

Because according to your code, you are binding the one event to '#mane" and not to '.one'.

It should be like this

$(".one").one("click", function(event){
    alert(1);
});
share|improve this answer
    
dont understand why this was downvoted? If you find this incorrect ,feel free to comment. Dont be a coward and keep on downvoting unnecessarily :) –  Mandeep Jain May 24 '13 at 14:33
1  
Because you didn't read the question - the OP is using event delegation with .on(), so that the event will fire once for any descendant .one element. Using your method (like the several other wrong answers) will only bind the event to elements that exist when the binding occurs. The point is that this doesn't work for dynamic .one elements which is what the OP needs –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:38
    
Hmm since it is not specifically mentioned that event delegation is needed to be used, most of them(the wrong answers according to you) have a different approach :) Anyways, thanks for making it clear :) –  Mandeep Jain May 24 '13 at 14:47
    
If the OP is using event delegation, and has commented on other answers saying something like "this won't work for live elements", then I'd say they "need" it. –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:48

Here's updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/74cv9/2/

And the code:

$("#mane").find('.one').one("click", function(event){
    alert(1);
});

The jQuery documentation states that:

the event handler is called once for each event type

not once per selector. And in your initial code there's only one event, 'click'.

Feel free to challenge my answer :)

share|improve this answer
    
The elements have to exist at the moment you bind the event handler, which does not seem to be what the OP wants. –  Felix Kling May 24 '13 at 14:30
    
This is not live, add another '$("<div class='one'>One</div>").appendTo("#mane");' bellow the action listener and this will fail. –  CezarisLT May 24 '13 at 14:34

How about this:

$("#mane").on("click", ".one", function(event){
  alert(1);
  $(this).off(event);
});
share|improve this answer
    
$this is not defined, and .off() accepts a string (event name) and an optional function reference, not an Event object –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:35
    
Missed the brackets around this. As for off() according to the documentation for one(), that syntax is perfectly valid. –  Ruy Diaz May 24 '13 at 14:37
1  
You have not tested this code and this is not working. –  CezarisLT May 24 '13 at 14:38
    
You're right. I think @adeneo's way might be the way to go. For the record, for the argument to off, from the docs: As with .on(), you can pass events as an object instead of specifying an events string and handler function as separate arguments. –  Ruy Diaz May 24 '13 at 14:43
1  
@RuyDiaz What they mean by that is that you can just pass something like this: {click: function () {}, change: function () {}} –  Ian May 24 '13 at 14:59

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