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I want to wrap a test project containing C++ and OpenMP code with Cython, and build it with distutils via a setup.py file. The content of my file looks like this:

from distutils.core import setup
from distutils.extension import Extension
from Cython.Build import cythonize
from Cython.Distutils import build_ext


modules = [Extension("Interface",
                     ["Interface.pyx", "Parallel.cpp"],
                     language = "c++",
                     extra_compile_args=["-fopenmp"],
                     extra_link_args=["-fopenmp"])]

for e in modules:
    e.cython_directives = {"embedsignature" : True}

setup(name="Interface",
     cmdclass={"build_ext": build_ext},
     ext_modules=modules)

The -fopenmp flag is used with gcc to compile and link against OpenMP. However, if I just invoke

cls ~/workspace/CythonOpenMP/src $ python3 setup.py build

this flag is not recognized, because the compiler is clang:

running build
running build_ext
skipping 'Interface.cpp' Cython extension (up-to-date)
building 'Interface' extension
cc -Wno-unused-result -fno-common -dynamic -DNDEBUG -g -O3 -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -I/usr/local/include -I/usr/local/opt/sqlite/include -I/usr/local/Cellar/python3/3.3.0/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/3.3/include/python3.3m -c Interface.cpp -o build/temp.macosx-10.8-x86_64-3.3/Interface.o -fopenmp
clang: warning: argument unused during compilation: '-fopenmp'
cc -Wno-unused-result -fno-common -dynamic -DNDEBUG -g -O3 -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -I/usr/local/include -I/usr/local/opt/sqlite/include -I/usr/local/Cellar/python3/3.3.0/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/3.3/include/python3.3m -c Parallel.cpp -o build/temp.macosx-10.8-x86_64-3.3/Parallel.o -fopenmp
clang: warning: argument unused during compilation: '-fopenmp'
Parallel.cpp:24:10: warning: unknown pragma ignored [-Wunknown-pragmas]
        #pragma omp parallel for
                ^
1 warning generated.
c++ -bundle -undefined dynamic_lookup -L/usr/local/lib -L/usr/local/opt/sqlite/lib build/temp.macosx-10.8-x86_64-3.3/Interface.o build/temp.macosx-10.8-x86_64-3.3/Parallel.o -o build/lib.macosx-10.8-x86_64-3.3/Interface.so -fopenmp
ld: library not found for -lgomp
clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation)
error: command 'c++' failed with exit status 1

I've unsucessfully tried to specify gcc:

cls ~/workspace/CythonOpenMP/src $ python3 setup.py build --compiler=g++-4.7
running build
running build_ext
error: don't know how to compile C/C++ code on platform 'posix' with 'g++-4.7' compiler

How can I tell distutils to use gcc?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try setting the "CC" and "CXX" environment variables from inside the setup.py with os.environ.

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3  
os.environ["CC"] = "g++-4.7" os.environ["CXX"] = "g++-4.7" just worked –  cls May 24 '13 at 14:45

Just in case some others are facing the same problem under Windows (where CC environment variable wouldn't have any effect) :

  • Create file "C:\Python27\Lib\distutils\distutils.cfg" and write this inside :

Code :

[build]
compiler = mingw32
  • Remove all instances of "-mno-cygwin" gcc option from file "C:\Python27\Lib\distutils\cygwinccompiler.py" :

This :

    self.set_executables(compiler='gcc -mno-cygwin -O -Wall',
                         compiler_so='gcc -mno-cygwin -mdll -O -Wall',
                         compiler_cxx='g++ -mno-cygwin -O -Wall',
                         linker_exe='gcc -mno-cygwin',
                         linker_so='%s -mno-cygwin %s %s'
                                    % (self.linker_dll, shared_option,
                                       entry_point))

Becomes this :

self.set_executables(compiler='gcc -O -Wall',
                     compiler_so='gcc -mdll -O -Wall',
                     compiler_cxx='g++ -O -Wall',
                     linker_exe='gcc',
                     linker_so='%s %s %s'
                                % (self.linker_dll, shared_option,
                                   entry_point))

The second point can be necessary in case you are using a recent version of gcc, where the deprecated option -mno-cygwin has been removed.

Hope this will help even if it is not directly related to the OP real needs (but still related to the question's title...)

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I was actually struggling with this problem a few minutes ago but I am now clear Thanks man! and why are we adding a new file to the distutils? –  thwildfire May 25 '13 at 1:40
    
It's 2014 now, and I have GCC version 4.3.3 and Python verison 3.4. I've implemented your solution with no results. I get the same error. I wrote [build] compiler = mingw32 into the config file, and deleted -mcygwin ... –  the_prole Nov 26 at 13:33
    
My answer might be outdated. That is completely possible. I am sorry if this is the case, but it's been a long time I haven't been working on portability stuffs under Windows (strict "Linux work" for months), and actually won't be able to help you with this, right now... Make sure you created distutils.cfg at the right place (the requirements might have changed for this file). Have you tried to compile using directly python3 setup.py build --compiler=mingw32? –  Gauthier Boaglio Nov 26 at 17:42

I just took a look at the distutils source, and the --compiler option expects "unix", "msvc", "cygwin", "mingw32", "bcpp", or "emx". It checks the compiler name you want by checking the CC environment variable. Try calling build like this:

CC=gcc python setup.py build

You don't need to set CXX, it doesn't check for that.

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This works too. –  cls May 24 '13 at 14:48

Try this: http://mail.python.org/pipermail/distutils-sig/2002-August/002944.html

In short, it appears that you should try: python setup.py build --compiler=g++ first.

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Found this too, but python setup.py build --compiler=g++ gives the same result as above. –  cls May 24 '13 at 14:32
    
what if you don't specify the version? –  Andrew W May 24 '13 at 14:34
    
Unless I misunderstand you, that's exactly what I tried. –  cls May 24 '13 at 14:35
    
python setup.py build --compiler=g++ vs. python setup.py build --compiler=g++-4.7 –  Andrew W May 24 '13 at 14:40

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