Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a matrix (relatively big) that I need to transpose. For example assume that my matrix is

a b c d e f
g h i j k l
m n o p q r 

I want the result be as follows:

a g m
b h n
c I o
d j p
e k q
f l r

What is the fastest way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
That's called "transposing". Rotating by 90 degrees is a completely different notion. –  Andy Prowl May 24 '13 at 14:26
15  
And the fastest way is not to rotate it but to simply swap the index order when you access the array. –  High Performance Mark May 24 '13 at 14:27
2  
No matter how fast it is, you have to access all the elements of the matrix anyway. –  taocp May 24 '13 at 14:28
3  
@HighPerformanceMark: I would guess it depends, if you then wish to access the matrix repetitively in row order, having a "transposed" flag will hit you hard. –  Matthieu M. May 24 '13 at 14:45
1  
Transposing matrices is notorious for the problems it causes with memory caches. If your array is large enough that the performance of a transpose is significant, and you cannot avoid transposing by simply providing an interface with swapped indices, then your best option is to use an existing library routine for transposing large matrices. Experts have already done this work, and you should use it. –  Eric Postpischil May 24 '13 at 21:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

This is going to depend on your application but in general the fastest way to transpose a matrix would be to invert your coordinates when you do a look up, then you do not have to actually move any data.

share|improve this answer
    
By invert coordinates, do you mean switch x and y axis? –  taocp May 24 '13 at 14:32
12  
This is great if it's a small matrix or you only read from it once. However, if the transposed matrix is large and needs to be reused many times, you may still to save a fast transposed version to get better memory access pattern. (+1, btw) –  Agentlien May 24 '13 at 14:34
2  
@Agentlien: Why would A[j][i] be any slower than A[i][j]? –  beaker May 24 '13 at 14:37
10  
@beaker If you have a large matrix, different rows/columns may occupy different cache lines/pages. In this case, you'd want to iterate over elements in such a way that you access adjacent elements after each other. Otherwise, it can lead to every element access becoming a cache miss, which completely destroys performance. –  Agentlien May 24 '13 at 14:44
6  
@beaker: it has to do with caching at CPU level (supposing that the matrix is a single big blob of memory), the cache lines are then effective lines of the matrix, and the prefetcher may fetch the next few lines. If you switch access, the CPU cache/prefetcher still work line by line whilst you access column by column, the performance drop can be dramatic. –  Matthieu M. May 24 '13 at 14:47

This is a good question. There are many reason you would want to actually transpose the matrix in memory rather than just swap coordinates, e.g. in matrix multiplication and Gaussian smearing.

First let me list one of the functions I use for the transpose (EDIT: please see the end of my answer where I found a much faster solution)

void tran(float *src, float *dst, const int N, const int M) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int n = 0; n<N*M; n++) {
        int i = n/N;
        int j = n%N;
        dst[n] = src[M*j + i];
    }
}

Now let's see why the transpose is useful. Consider matrix multiplication C = A*B. We could do it this way.

for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<K; j++) {
        float tmp = 0;
        for(int l=0; l<M; l++) {
            tmp += A[M*i+l]*B[K*l+j];
        }
        C[K*i + j] = tmp;
    }
}

That way, however, is going to have a lot of cache misses. A much faster solution is to take the transpose of B first

transpose(B);
for(int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    for(int j=0; j<K; j++) {
        float tmp = 0;
        for(int l=0; l<M; l++) {
            tmp += A[M*i+l]*B[K*j+l];
        }
        C[K*i + j] = tmp;
    }
}
transpose(B);

Matrix multiplication goes as O(N*N*N) and the transpose goes as O(N*N) so taking the transpose should have a negligible effect on the computation time (for large N). In matrix multiplication loop tiling is even more effective than taking the transpose but that's much more complicated.

I wish I knew a faster way to do the transpose (Edit: I found a faster solution, see the end of my answer). When Haswell/AVX2 comes out in a few weeks it will have a gather function. I don't know if that will be helpful in this case but I could image gathering a column and writing out a row. Maybe it will make the transpose unnecessary.

For Gaussian smearing what you do is smear horizontally and then smear vertically. But smearing vertically has the cache problem so what you do is

Smear image horizontally
transpose output 
Smear output horizontally
transpose output

Here is a paper by Intel explaining that http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/iir-gaussian-blur-filter-implementation-using-intel-advanced-vector-extensions

Lastly, what I actually do in matrix multiplication (and in Gaussian smearing) is not take exactly the transpose but take the transpose in widths of a certain vector size (e.g. 4 or 8 for SSE/AVX). Here is the function I use

void reorder_matrix(const float* A, float* B, const int N, const int M, const int vec_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int n=0; n<M*N; n++) {
        int k = vec_size*(n/N/vec_size);
        int i = (n/vec_size)%N;
        int j = n%vec_size;
        B[n] = A[M*i + k + j];
    }
}

EDIT:

I tried several function to find the fastest transpose for large matrices. In the end the fastest result is to use loop blocking with block_size=16 (Edit: I found a faster solution using SSE and loop blocking - see below). This code works for any NxM matrix (i.e. the matrix does not have to be square).

inline void transpose_scalar_block(float *A, float *B, const int lda, const int ldb, const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<block_size; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<block_size; j++) {
            B[j*ldb + i] = A[i*lda +j];
        }
    }
}

inline void transpose_block(float *A, float *B, const int n, const int m, const int lda, const int ldb, const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<n; i+=block_size) {
        for(int j=0; j<m; j+=block_size) {
            transpose_scalar_block(&A[i*lda +j], &B[j*ldb + i], lda, ldb, block_size);
        }
    }
}

The values lda and ldb are the width of the matrix. These need to be multiples of the block size. To find the values and allocate the memory for e.g. a 3000x1001 matrix I do something like this

#define ROUND_UP(x, s) (((x)+((s)-1)) & -(s))
const int n = 3000;
const int m = 1001;
int lda = ROUND_UP(m, 16);
int ldb = ROUND_UP(n, 16);

float *A = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*lda*ldb, 64);
float *B = (float*)_mm_malloc(sizeof(float)*lda*ldb, 64);

For 3000x1001 this returns ldb = 3008 and lda = 1008

Edit:

I found an even faster solution using SSE

inline void transpose4x4_SSE(float *A, float *B, const int lda, const int ldb) {
    __m128 row1 = _mm_load_ps(&A[0*lda]);
    __m128 row2 = _mm_load_ps(&A[1*lda]);
    __m128 row3 = _mm_load_ps(&A[2*lda]);
    __m128 row4 = _mm_load_ps(&A[3*lda]);
     _MM_TRANSPOSE4_PS(row1, row2, row3, row4);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[0*ldb], row1);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[1*ldb], row2);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[2*ldb], row3);
     _mm_store_ps(&B[3*ldb], row4);
}

inline void transpose_block_SSE4x4(float *A, float *B, const int n, const int m, const int lda, const int ldb ,const int block_size) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int i=0; i<n; i+=block_size) {
        for(int j=0; j<m; j+=block_size) {
            int max_i2 = i+block_size < n ? i + block_size : n;
            int max_j2 = j+block_size < m ? j + block_size : m;
            for(int i2=i; i2<max_i2; i2+=4) {
                for(int j2=j; j2<max_j2; j2+=4) {
                    transpose4x4_SSE(&A[i2*lda +j2], &B[j2*ldb + i2], lda, ldb);
                }
            }
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
template <class T>
void transpose( std::vector< std::vector<T> > a,
std::vector< std::vector<T> > b,
int width, int height)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < width; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < height; j++)
        {
            b[j][i] = a[i][j];
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
    
I'd rather think it would be faster if you exchange the two loops, due to a smaller cache miss penalty at writing than reading. –  phoeagon May 24 '13 at 15:31
2  
This only works for a square matrix. A rectangular matrix is a whole different problem! –  NealB May 24 '13 at 15:39
    
The question asks for the fastest way. This is just a way. What makes you think it is fast, let alone fastest? For large matrices, this will thrash cache and have terrible performance. –  Eric Postpischil May 24 '13 at 21:08
    
@NealB: How do you figure that? –  Eric Postpischil May 24 '13 at 21:11

I think that most fast way should not taking higher than O(n^2) also in this way you can use just O(1) space :
the way to do that is to swap in pairs because when you transpose a matrix then what you do is: M[i][j]=M[j][i] , so store M[i][j] in temp, then M[i][j]=M[j][i],and the last step : M[j][i]=temp. this could be done by one pass so it should take O(n^2)

share|improve this answer

transposing without any overhead (class not complete):

class Matrix{
   double *data; //suppose this will point to data
   double _get1(int i, int j){return data[i*M+j];} //used to access normally
   double _get2(int i, int j){return data[j*N+i];} //used when transposed

   public:
   int M, N; //dimensions
   double (*get_p)(int, int); //functor to access elements  
   Matrix(int _M,int _N):M(_M), N(_N){
     //allocate data
     get_p=&Matrix::_get1; // initialised with normal access 
     }

   double get(int i, int j){
     //there should be a way to directly use get_p to call. but i think even this
     //doesnt incur overhead because it is inline and the compiler should be intelligent
     //enough to remove the extra call
     return (this->*get_p)(i,j);
    }
   void transpose(){ //twice transpose gives the original
     if(get_p==&Matrix::get1) get_p=&Matrix::_get2;
     else get_p==&Matrix::_get1; 
     swap(M,N);
     }
}

can be used like this:

Matrix M(100,200);
double x=M.get(17,45);
M.transpose();
x=M.get(17,45); // = original M(45,17)

of course I didn't bother with the memory management here, which is crucial but different topic.

share|improve this answer
    
You have an overhead from your function pointer that has to be followed for each element access. –  user877329 2 days ago

Consider each row as a column, and each column as a row .. use j,i instead of i,j

demo: http://ideone.com/lvsxKZ

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    char A [3][3] =
    {
        { 'a', 'b', 'c' },
        { 'd', 'e', 'f' },
        { 'g', 'h', 'i' }
    };

    cout << "A = " << endl << endl;

    // print matrix A
    for (int i=0; i<3; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<3; j++) cout << A[i][j];
        cout << endl;
    }

    cout << endl << "A transpose = " << endl << endl;

    // print A transpose
    for (int i=0; i<3; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<3; j++) cout << A[j][i];
        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

my answer is transposed of 3x3 matrix

 #include<iostream.h>

#include<math.h>


main()
{
int a[3][3];
int b[3];
cout<<"You must give us an array 3x3 and then we will give you Transposed it "<<endl;
for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
{
    for(int j=0;j<3;j++)
{
cout<<"Enter a["<<i<<"]["<<j<<"]: ";

cin>>a[i][j];

}

}
cout<<"Matrix you entered is :"<<endl;

 for (int e = 0 ; e < 3 ; e++ )

{
    for ( int f = 0 ; f < 3 ; f++ )

        cout << a[e][f] << "\t";


    cout << endl;

    }

 cout<<"\nTransposed of matrix you entered is :"<<endl;
 for (int c = 0 ; c < 3 ; c++ )
{
    for ( int d = 0 ; d < 3 ; d++ )
        cout << a[d][c] << "\t";

    cout << endl;
    }

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Shafik Yaghmour Jul 18 at 3:09

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.