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Consider you have the following method:

public Foo ParseMe(string filepath)
{
    // break up filename
    // validate filename & extension
    // retrieve info from file if it's a certain type
    // some other general things you could do, etc

    var myInfo = GetFooInfo(filename);

    // create new object based on this data returned AND data in this method
}

Currently I have unit tests for GetFooInfo, but I think I also need to build unit tests for ParseMe. In a situation like this where you have a two methods that return two different properties - and a change in either of them could break something - should unit tests be created for both to determine the output is as expected?

I like to err on the side of caution and be more wary about things breaking and ensuring that maintenance later on down the road is easier, but I feel very skeptical about adding very similar tests in the test project. Would this be bad practice or is there any way to do this more efficiently?

I'm marking this as language agnostic, but just in case it matters I am using C# and NUnit - Also, I saw a post similar to this in title only, but the question is different. Sorry if this has already been asked.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

ParseMe looks sufficiently non-trivial to require a unit test. To answer your precise question, if "you have a two methods that return two different properties - and a change in either of them could break something" you should absolutely unit test them.

Even if the bulk of the work is in GetFooInfo, at minimum you should test that it's actually called. I know nothing about NUnit, but I know in other frameworks (like RSpec) you can write tests like GetFooInfo.should be_called(:once).

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It is not a bad practice to test a method that is calling another method. In fact, it is a good practice. If you have a method calling another method, it is probably performing additional functionality, which should be tested.

If you find yourself unit testing a method that calls a method that is also being unit tested, then you are probably experiencing code reuse, which is a good thing.

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I agree with @tsm - absolutely test both methods (assuming both are public).

This may be a smell that the method or class is doing too much - violating the Single Responsibility Principle. Consider doing an Extract Class refactoring and decoupling the two classes (possibly with Dependency Injection). That way you could test both pieces of functionality independently. (That said, I'd only do that if the functionality was sufficiently complex to warrant it. It's a judgment call.)

Here's an example in C#:

public interface IFooFileInfoProvider
{
    FooInfo GetFooInfo(string filename);
}

public class Parser
{
    private readonly IFooFileInfoProvider _fooFileInfoProvider;

    public Parser(IFooFileInfoProvider fooFileInfoProvider)
    {
        // Add a null check
        _fooFileInfoProvider = fooFileInfoProvider;
    }

    public Foo ParseMe(string filepath)
    {
        string filename = Path.GetFileName(filepath);
        var myInfo = _fooFileInfoProvider.GetFooInfo(filename);
        return new Foo(myInfo);
    }
}

public class FooFileInfoProvider : IFooFileInfoProvider
{
    public FooInfo GetFooInfo(string filename)
    {
        // Do I/O
        return new FooInfo();  // parameters...
    }
}
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Many developers, me included, take a programming by contract approach. That requires you to consider each method as a black box. If the method delegates to another method to accomplish its task does not matter, when you are testing the method. But you should also test all large or complicated parts of your program as units. So whether you need to unit test the GetFooInfo depends on how complicated that method is.

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