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What's the difference? Is there any?

var Likes = function (el) {
  this.el = $(el);
  return this;
};

Likes.prototype.add = function (name) {
  this.el.find('.no-results').remove();
  $('<li>', { text: name }).appendTo(this.el);
};

and:

var Likes = function (el) {
  this.el = $(el);
  this.add = function (name) {
    this.el.find('.no-results').remove();
    $('<li>', { text: name }).appendTo(this.el);
  };
  return this;
};
share|improve this question
    
The only reason that I can think of that you should use the second example is when you have a variable inside of Likes that the method needs to access. For example, if you declared var something = 1; and your add method needed to access it, you couldn't declare it like your first example –  Ian May 24 '13 at 15:42
    
possible dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/310870/… –  bPratik May 24 '13 at 15:44
    
Thanks guys, I wasn't even sure how to phrase the question really, or how to look it up quickly. Was just something I always wondered about. Very informative, thanks! –  rball May 24 '13 at 16:07
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marked as duplicate by Ian, Łukasz 웃 L ツ, Bergi, Niels Keurentjes, Sunil D. May 26 '13 at 23:21

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference is in how the object gets created. When you define functions on an object's prototype, it's defined ONCE for every further instance of that object.

If you declare functions on an instance level, they get redefined each time you declare the function.

It actually has a performance impact http://jsperf.com/prototype-vs-instance-functions

It's generally considered a best practice to use the prototype for functions that will be re-used on multiple instances of a constructor. For example if you are using the new operator to create instances of a constructor..

var Likes = function (el) {
  this.el = $(el);
  return this;
};

Likes.prototype.add = function (name) {
  this.el.find('.no-results').remove();
  $('<li>', { text: name }).appendTo(this.el);
};

var oneLike = new Likes();
var twoLike = new Likes();
var threeLike = new Likes();

Since the add is defined on the object's prototype, it gets define just one time rather than each time the Likes is instantiated.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, went right to the point –  Frederik.L May 24 '13 at 15:57
    
In my case I would only have one "Likes" object. –  rball May 24 '13 at 16:01
    
I get the impression that the prototype method might have a slight runtime performance hit due to having to go up the prototype chain when a property isn't found in a particular instance. Perhaps the second method (the 'inline' method) might have an small advantage when there are numerous property accesses on fewer instances (?). Seems like there might be a couple of trade-offs there (instantiation vs runtime and memory vs speed). –  jongo45 May 24 '13 at 16:46
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Yes, there is a difference.

If you uses prototype object, then all created objects of 'Likes' will have same reference to prototype object. But if you use second method (this.add), it will add function to every created object.

First one is more prefer method than second one.

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Example 2 is the better practice because it lends itself to implementing inheritance rather than making wasteful copies of object properties.

In a small application with no inheritance, there is probably not much of a practical difference between the two examples. But imagine that you had 10000 instances of the Likes constructor in a more complex application using inheritance. With the second example, each one of them will receive a copy of the add function locally.

This could theoretically cause memory bottlenecks in a larger application. Also, if you want to change the add method in the future, you would need to do so on each local object.

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What happens if you only have one instance? Are they then somewhat similar? –  rball May 24 '13 at 15:52
1  
Then the add function is defined only twice: once on the constructor and once on the local object. So practically speaking, in that case it wouldn't be much of a problem, but is still contrary to the 'best practice' of example 1 for the reason above. –  sh0ber May 24 '13 at 15:55
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