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I'm trying to write a query that will project to a DTO where two of the properties are int arrays. I'm getting an error because of the ToArray() call in the projection.

teams = context
  .Teams
  .Include("TeamDepartments")
  .Include("TeamEmployees")
  .Select(t => new TeamDto
      {
          sourceSystemId = t.TeamId,
          name = t.Name,
          manager = t.EmployeeIdTeamManager,
          teamLead = t.EmployeeIdTeamLead,
          employees = t.TeamEmployees.Select(te => te.EmployeeId).ToArray(),
          departments = t.TeamDepartments.Select(td => td.DepartmentId).ToArray()
       })
  .ToList();

For employees and departments, which are the two int[ ] properties, how can I get those values? For now, I'm just pulling back the list of teams and then looping over them to create the DTO.

I've seen other similar questions, but the solutions do not seem to be working for me. I suspect there's an additional step I need to take because I'm traversing a relationship.

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1  
Could you post the TeamDto entitie? –  Fals May 24 '13 at 17:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you need to do is separate this query into two different steps; the first will retrieve the correct results, and the second will project the data into your DTO. Like this:

teams = context
  .Teams
  .Include("TeamDepartments")
  .Include("TeamEmployees")
  .Select(t => new // notice this is an anonymous object
      {
          sourceSystemId = t.TeamId,
          name = t.Name,
          manager = t.EmployeeIdTeamManager,
          teamLead = t.EmployeeIdTeamLead,
          employees = t.TeamEmployees.Select(te => te.EmployeeId),
          departments = t.TeamDepartments.Select(td => td.DepartmentId)
       })
  .ToList() // first run the query on the server without the ToArray calls
  .Select(obj => new TeamDto
      {     // then project the in-memory results onto your DTO.
          sourceSystemId = obj.sourceSystemId,
          name = obj.name,
          manager = obj.manager,
          teamLead = obj.teamLead,
          employees = obj.employees.ToArray(),
          departments = obj.departments.ToArray()
      })
  .ToList();
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Maybe ommit the first ToList() to prevent an overhead, given that you can do a Select from the first query result, that is IQueryable. –  Fals May 24 '13 at 17:27
3  
The first ToList is necessary because the query needs to be run on the server prior to the subsequent call to Select projecting to the DTO using the ToArray calls, because those calls can't be translated to SQL. –  Adam Maras May 24 '13 at 17:36
    
I got it! Thank you very much for the explanation! –  Fals May 24 '13 at 17:54
    
Be sure to mark this answer as accepted once you've tested the solution to make sure it suits your needs. –  Adam Maras May 24 '13 at 17:57
    
Im not the question owner! Just took a look on the problem, and had a doubt that you explained very well! –  Fals May 24 '13 at 17:59

I believe the problem is that you're attempting to call ToArray within the block that the SQL provider converts to a SQL query. Of course, SQL Server has no idea what an array is so that method does not work. What happens if you remove the ToArray call? I believe those results will come back as IEnumberables outside of that block you can convert them as needed. I'm not sure this will work but if you change your TeamDto definition in the following way it may solve the problem.

 // you have now something like
 string[] employees;
 // instead do
 IEnumberable<string> employees;
 // If you want an array add
 string[] _employees;

Then outside of the query to _employees = employees.ToArray();

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