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I am testing using unsafe and pointers on character match counting a 200 byte array along every position in a 1 meg long char array as an experiment with safe/unsafe/dll call speed comparison.

They are run in release mode with optimize code on, allow unsafe, no bounds checking. Long char array is used purposely used to minimize calling overhead impacts.

The times i get are

regular 560 ms

unsafe 830 ms

dll 205 ms

why is the unsafe slower??

    byte[] buffer = new Byte[1000000];
    byte[] check = new Byte[1000];
    [DllImport("sortitdev.dll", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]
  //[DllImport("sortitfast.dll", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]      
  //[DllImport("sortitpellas.dll", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]        

    public unsafe static extern void sortitt([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray)] byte[] buffer);

    public MainForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    void Button1Click(object sender, EventArgs e)  // do char array matching
    {
        byte match;
        Random rnd = new Random();
        for(int i=0;i<1000000;i++)
            buffer[i]=(byte)rnd.Next(0,256);
        for(int i=0;i<200;i++)
            check[i]=(byte)rnd.Next(0,256);
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        int kk=0;
        int jq=0;
        while(kk<999000)
        {
            kk++;
            match=0;
            for(jq=0;jq<199;jq++)
                if(buffer[kk+jq]==check[jq])match++;
            buffer[kk]=match;
        }
        sw.Stop();
        textBox1.Text= sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();
        sw.Reset();
        sw.Start();
        unsafe
        {
            fixed (byte* bufptr=&buffer[0] , chckptr=&check[0])
            {
                byte* bufptrC=bufptr;  // modifiable pointer
                byte* chckptrC=chckptr;
                byte* bufhldptr;
                byte* chckhldptr;
                int k=999000;
                int jw=0;
                while(k>0)
                {
                    bufhldptr=bufptrC;
                    match=0;
                    chckhldptr=chckptrC;
                    for(jw=0;jw<199;jw++)
                        if(*bufhldptr++==*chckhldptr++)match++;
                    *bufptrC++=match;
                    k--;
                }
            }
            sw.Stop();
            textBox2.Text= sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();
        }
        sw.Reset();
        for(int tt=0;tt<200;tt++) buffer[tt]=(byte)tt;

        sw.Start();
        unsafe
        {
            fixed(byte* dadata=&buffer[0])
            {
                sortitt(buffer);
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        textBox3.Text= sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();
        int kll=(int)buffer[1];
        textBox4.Text= kll.ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
BTW I think you should use spaces more, it will make your code more readable. This is not code golf. –  svick May 24 '13 at 18:25
    
Just to make sure, did you run this without the debugger attached? –  svick May 24 '13 at 18:26
2  
I checked your code and your calculations 1 and 2 give different answers for the same input vector - algorithms are not really the same. –  ghord May 24 '13 at 18:38
1  
I also checked your code and I got 902 ms and 738 ms with unsafe being faster... –  Alan May 24 '13 at 18:40
1  
For bench-marking, remember this: Build and run without a debugger. –  Pieter Geerkens May 24 '13 at 18:41
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I checked your code, I did not get that your unsafe code was slower. However, I re-wrote your unsafe code (rather quickly - double check) but I believe this should be much simpler for you:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    byte[] buffer = new byte[1000000];
    byte[] check = new byte[200];

    private unsafe void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)  // do char array matching
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        rnd.NextBytes(buffer);
        rnd.NextBytes(check);
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        byte match = 0;
        int kk = 0;
        int jq = 0;

        while (kk < 999000)
        {
            kk++;
            match = 0;
            for (jq = 0; jq < 199; jq++)
                if (buffer[kk + jq] == check[jq])
                    match++;
            buffer[kk] = match;
        }

        sw.Stop();
        textBox1.Text = sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();
        sw.Reset();
        sw.Start();

        fixed (byte* pCheck = check, pBuffer = buffer)
        {
            match = 0;
            kk = 0;
            jq = 0;

            while (kk < 999000)
            {
                kk++;
                match = 0;
                for (jq = 0; jq < 199; jq++)
                    if (pBuffer[kk + jq] == pCheck[jq])
                        match++;
                pBuffer[kk] = match;
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        textBox2.Text = sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString();
    }
}

results:

managed: 404 ms unsafe: 284 ms

This was executed in release by right clicking project and starting new instance without debugger. I also checked my code and it gives the same result with both methods.

share|improve this answer
    
seems like pointer dereferencing is an extra step in dot net? –  Kelsey Bowman May 24 '13 at 18:56
    
@KelseyBowman You can change it to pointer arithmetic if you wish, but I believe they are the same thing. i.e. ptr[5] is same as *(ptr + 5). I'll give it a try –  Alan May 24 '13 at 19:00
    
if(*bufhldptr++==*chckhldptr++)match++; In the old days of native code generation this type of stuff was faster because variables were already in processor registers. But this does not seem to apply to managed code ?? –  Kelsey Bowman May 24 '13 at 19:02
1  
@KelseyBowman It seems to me that your version has a lot more variables (extra pointers defined). If there were an optimization to be made, I believe my version is proper enough for the optimizer to take care of it. Also, if you want the code to run faster, unroll the loop and read in 32/64 bits at a time depending on your architecture instead of byte-by-byte. That's probably going to be a real improvement. –  Alan May 24 '13 at 19:10
    
found a serious issue with this speed test code, the buffer is overwritten in each test which leads to different conditions for subsequent tests, specifically how many times match++ is executed. I changed it so that each method runs the same input data and the results are much more consistent with unsafe being about 10% faster but still 2.3x as long as a c dll call. –  Kelsey Bowman May 24 '13 at 20:21
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