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I'm sorry if this question is a duplicate, but I really don't know how to search for it. This question may sound "odd" for an expert JavaScript programmer, but I'm not.

I'm basically trying to do a "one line return", without wasting another line of code. I know that it's not good, and the following it's not code for production:

var _ = require('underscore');

module.exports = function (digits) {
    if (!/^\d+$/.test(digits)) return undefined;

    var precomp = [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9];

    var sum = _.reduce(digits.toString(), function (mem, dgt, idx) {
        return mem + (idx % 2 == 0 ? parseInt(dgt) : precomp[dgt]);
    }, 0);

    return (var mod = sum % 10 == 0) ? 0 : 10 - mod; // Error
};

The last line throws an error because the var keyword. I remember doing sometimes the same in PHP.

EDIT: I don't think so "hard" to read the question before answer... I'm asking if it's possible, I'm not saying it's right, good looking, or whatever.

(By the way this is the luhn check calculation)

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1  
I'm just wondering, are you downvoting all those legitimate and still correct answers? –  Marcel Gwerder May 24 '13 at 19:24
1  
btw: you'll have to put mod = sum % 10 in parentheses otherwise it won't work because mod would be the result of the == operator and thus a boolean. –  basilikum May 24 '13 at 19:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

VariableDeclaration are not expressions. Just declare it before.

module.exports = function (digits) {
    var mod;

    // ...

    return (mod = sum % 10 ...
}
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1  
Yes, but not exactly what I asked... –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:07
1  
If you really don't want another line for some reason, add the declaration of mod to one of your other var lines: var precomp = [...], mod; –  apsillers May 24 '13 at 19:09
1  
@Gremo I'm not clear how this fails to answer your question. The first sentence here addresses your question directly and says it's not possible in very direct language-specification terms, and the rest of the answer suggests a perfectly suitable workaround. –  apsillers May 24 '13 at 19:14
    
Not possible to declare the var just after the return statement, and using it in the return statement. If you are 100% sure that's not possible, just say it in your answer, I'll accept it. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:16
2  
@Gremo It's not possible; that's what this answer says. According to the ECMAScript spec, a VariableStatement is not valid in the first part of a ConditionalStatement, which must be a EqualityExpression‌​. That's exactly what this answer is getting at with its first sentence (i.e., what the OP is trying to do is not possible), but it's not clear unless you know where to look in the spec. –  apsillers May 24 '13 at 19:25

I think the only way for you to do this is:

var mod = sum % 10;
return (mod == 0) ? 0 : 10 - mod;

Who cares about one extra line of code? Why does that matter?

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I made it clear in the question about not asking WHY i want to write code like this. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:04
    
Well whatever the reason is, it's not possible. –  SpikeX May 24 '13 at 19:05
    
That is an answer. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:05

I think you're trying too hard here. Just move var mod before the return statement. You're NOT going to be struck dead by the software gods for having one more line of code here. Clarity over conciseness.

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Same comment as below: I made it clear in the question about not asking WHY i want to write code like this. I want to know if it's possible, because (say) PHP will let do it. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:06
1  
Fair enough; it's one of those curious things we all encounter when switching between languages. –  kevin628 May 24 '13 at 19:07
    
Javascript isn't very close to PHP syntax, just because PHP will let you do it doesn't mean Javascript will. Just accept that you need two lines for this in JS. –  SpikeX May 24 '13 at 19:07
    
@SpikeX I'm not saying that it should. I'm actually enjoying javascript. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:10

JavaScript is not PHP

var mod = sum % 10;
return (mod === 0) ? 0 : 10 - mod;
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I see you don't like any of the answers so far. One way to avoid declaring the variable first is this, which you probably won't like either:

return (sum % 10 == 0) ? 0 : 10 - (sum % 10);

This doesn't require an extra line, but it does require an extra mod.


Another option, which might make the code extemely confusing, is to add a dummy argument to the function:

module.exports = function (digits, mod) {
    /* code */
    return (mod = sum % 10) == 0 ? 0 : 10 - mod; // Error
};
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+1 while it does perform the same operation twice (bad), it does answer OP's question (good). –  SpikeX May 24 '13 at 19:11
    
Yes, that's why I said the OP probably wouldn't like it (I certainly don't). –  bfavaretto May 24 '13 at 19:12
    
Because no one seems to understand the question. It's so obvious that I would need to add var on top of my script. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:12
    
OP seems to have thrown out all reason and logic and is quite hellbent on putting this on one line, so he probably will like it. :) –  SpikeX May 24 '13 at 19:12
    
@bfavaretto already thought about your solution, of course I don't like it. But I didn't downvoted you. –  gremo May 24 '13 at 19:14

Since you don't use sum for any other purpose, you could move the % operator up, doing:

var _ = require('underscore');

module.exports = function (digits) {
    if (!/^\d+$/.test(digits)) return undefined;

    var precomp = [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9];

    var sum = _.reduce(digits.toString(), function (mem, dgt, idx) {
        return mem + (idx % 2 == 0 ? parseInt(dgt) : precomp[dgt]);
    }, 0) % 10;

    return (sum == 0) ? 0 : 10 - sum; // Error
};
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